Road To The Olympic Games

Notifications

Make doping a crime in Russia, says leading official

Russian athletes who use banned substances in the future should face criminal charges, the Russian Olympic official in charge of resolving the country's doping crisis said Friday.

Also could face a public list of who has been banned

Gennady Alyoshin, who chairs a taskforce created to clean up doping in Russia, seen here in November 2015, said Friday he believes athletes in the country who test positive for banned substances in the future should face criminal charges. (Pavel Golovkin/The Associated Press)

Russian athletes who use banned substances in the future should face criminal charges, the Russian Olympic official in charge of resolving the country's doping crisis said Friday.

Gennady Alyoshin, the point man in talks between the Russian Olympic Committee and the IAAF over readmitting Russia's banned track and field athletes, told a Russian parliamentary committee that making dopers criminally liable under Russian law was inevitable.

"It's clear that now we have to implement criminal responsibility and that you can't cope without that," the state-run Tass news agency quoted Alyoshin as saying.

Alyoshin also called for doped athletes to be publicly shamed with the creation of a list of all who have been handed doping bans.

Russia was banned from global track and field in November and its national anti-doping agency forced to halt testing. That followed a World Anti-Doping Agency commission report alleging widespread, state-sponsored doping and coverups in Russia.

Alyoshin suggested that Russia bore full responsibility for its doping crisis, but also claimed the international condemnation had been politically motivated.

"We were heading for this trouble for a long time, very persistently and emphatically. We were told and warned, but we persisted in heading towards it," he said. "And when a political crisis happened, it was used against us in a moment."

Broadcast Partners

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.