Pittsburgh Penguins centre Sidney Crosby will meet with Dr. Ted Carrick, the Canadian-born chiropractic neurology specialist who treated him in August, according to the team’s website.

Crosby has not played since Dec. 5 because of lingering concussion-like symptoms but joined the Penguins on their recent road trip and skated on Friday and Saturday.

He admitted to having dizziness and balance problems on Friday, areas where Carrick helped the Penguins superstar previously. However, the bigger issue remains how his body reacts when he's moving.

Crosby did not return with the team to Pittsburgh and instead travelled to meet with Carrick, who has practices in Florida and Georgia.

"Sidney has made a lot of progress, but he is still having some symptoms, so this is the next step in his recovery," said Penguins general manager Ray Shero. "Obviously he won’t be back in the lineup until he is symptom-free."

Crosby's agent, Pat Brisson, noted that Carrick specializes in helping the "vestibular system" — which contributes to balance and spatial awareness.

The Toronto-born Carrick founded the Carrick Institute for Graduate Studies to teach his method of treating brain injuries. Viewed by some medical professionals as unorthodox, Carrick's holistic approach has gained notoriety through his work with Crosby, which was documented on CBC's Hockey Night in Canada and in a lengthy MacLean's feature.

The 24-year-old was originally diagnosed with a concussion on Jan. 6, 2011, and didn't return to play until Nov. 21. He played eight games and collected 12 points before being re-injured against the Boston Bruins on Dec. 5, and there is no timetable for his return to game action.

CBCSports.ca’s Tim Wharnsby doesn’t expect the pride of Cole Harbour, N.S., in the Penguins' lineup until he has skated for at least a month with his teammates.

"He’s only 24 years old, we forget about that," Wharnsby said. "He’s still got a bright future, obviously, ahead of him so he’s just going to take his time and make sure everything is 100 per cent before he comes back."

With files from The Canadian Press