The Ottawa Senators acquired goalie Ben Bishop in a trade with St. Louis early Sunday, adding insurance for a position that became more uncertain with the injury earlier this week to Craig Anderson.

The Senators said through their Twitter feed that they had traded for the six-foot-seven netminder, surrendering a second round pick in the 2013 NHL Entry Draft.

"Ottawa’s a great hockey city and it’s a great, fresh start for me," Bishop told the team's website. "I’m really excited. Words cannot describe how excited I am right now."

Ottawa was suddenly thrust into goalie uncertainty after netminder Craig Anderson suffered an injury to his pinky finger at home, which will put him out an uncertain number of weeks.

As a result, the club's path to a playoff spot has appeared more challenging.

Career backup Alex Auld got the call in Saturday's 5-3 loss to the Bruins, allowing four goals on 37 shots. The final goal came into an empty net.

Robin Lehner was called up from the American Hockey League after Anderson's injury, but the promising young Swedish goalie hasn't had the best of seasons with Binghamton.

Bishop, 25, has 13 games of NHL experience. But with Jaroslav Halak and former Senator Brian Elliott giving St. Louis certainty in net, his prospects for the foreseeable future were limited.

Bishop, who grew up in the St. Louis area, was scheduled to be an unrestricted free agent this summer.

He has starred with Peoria in the American Hockey League this season, with a league-best six shutouts in 38 appearances, with a 2.26 goals-against average.

"

[Ben] was a professional on and off the ice for us and we wish him nothing but the best in Ottawa," Blues general manager Doug Armstrong said in a statement.

According to the Sens and the player's agency, the two sides will finalize a one-year, one-way contract this week.

The transaction continues an Ottawa tradition over the past two decades of acquiring a netminder near the deadline. Bishop joins the likes of Anderson, Pascal Leclaire, Tom Barrasso and Damian Rhodes in that regard.

With files from The Associated Press