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NHL faces concussion lawsuits from 9 former players

Nine former players have sued the National Hockey League over concussions, saying the league subjects its players to "devastating and long-term" health consequences by failing to warn players of the risks and consequences of head trauma.

More than 200 ex-players filed suit last November

One-time Minnesota Stars defenceman Brad Maxwell is one of nine former NHL players named in a concussion lawsuit against the league. The suit says the league subjects its players to "devastating and long-term" health consequences by failing to warn players of the risks and consequences of head trauma. (Associated Press/File)

Nine former players have sued the National Hockey League over concussions, saying the league subjects its players to "devastating and long-term" health consequences by failing to warn players of the risks and consequences of head trauma.

Among the players are former all-star defenceman Brad Maxwell and Jack Carlson, whose brothers starred in the film "Slapshot."

The lawsuit in Manhattan federal court was filed late Wednesday, several months after a similar lawsuit was filed by 10 former NHL players in Washington. Both lawsuits seek unspecified damages, along with a medical monitoring program to care for former and current NHL players.

A message for comment from an NHL spokesman was not immediately returned.

The lawsuits were filed just months after the NFL agreed to pay $765 million US to settle lawsuits from thousands of former players who developed dementia or other concussion-related health problems. That settlement is awaiting a judge's approval.

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