Notifications

Recap

Ovechkin records historic hat trick as Capitals crush Canadiens

Alex Ovechkin scored four goals to become the first player in 100 years with back-to-back hat tricks to open a season, and the Washington Capitals beat the Montreal Canadiens 6-1 on Saturday night.

Washington captain earns 4th 4-goal game

Washington Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin (8), of Russia, celebrates his goal next to Montreal Canadiens defenceman Karl Alzner (22) during the first period. (Nick Wass/The Associated Press)

Alex Ovechkin had a historic night, and now he could use a travel agent.

Anything to keep this roll going.

Ovechkin scored four goals to become the first player in 100 years with back-to-back hat tricks to open a season, and the Washington Capitals beat the Montreal Canadiens 6-1 on Saturday night.

Capitals' Ovechkin earns hat tricks in consecutive games for the first time in his career 0:44

Ovechkin had three goals in the third period in Thursday's opening night win at Ottawa, then matched the feat while helping chase Montreal goalie Carey Price in the first period Saturday. He added his fourth goal at 16:46 of the second period against Al Montoya.

Sister-in-law good luck charm?

Ovechkin jokingly credited the outburst to his Russian sister-in-law, who has been visiting the U.S. this week.

"Every time she's in town like I score a hat trick," Ovechkin said. "Back-to-back and she's leaving Monday. I'm pretty sure I'm going to have to talk to someone to keep her here."

It was the fourth four-goal game of his career and second against the Canadiens.

Three players had hat tricks in the first two games of the 1917-18 season: Cy Denneny of Ottawa, Joe Malone of Montreal and Reg Noble of Toronto, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Ovechkin is the first since.

Braden Holtby stopped 38 shots and T.J. Oshie also scored for Washington.

Ovechkin opened the scoring 20 seconds in, added his second goal at 2:51 and his third at 18:10. Evgeny Kusnetsov assisted on all four of Ovechkin's goals.

Ovechkin scored four goals, while Nathan Walker became the first Australian to score in an NHL game as the Washington Capitals stomped on the Montreal Canadiens 6-1 1:46

"It's a fun time when you play like that and your line's feeling it," Ovechkin said. "When your line's feeling it, you just want to be out there more and more. Sometimes you play well but you don't score. Right now it's we play well, we score goals, we're dangerous. All three forwards are dangerous and we just have to continue to play like that."

Capitals coach Barry Trotz spent time with his star in the off-season, and he's heartened that the 32-year-old Ovechkin worked hard to prepare for the season.

"Alex took it to heart that he's got to keep evolving," Trotz said. "It's tougher when you're older. You've got to work out harder."

Oshie gave Washington a 2-0 lead 46 seconds into the game, and the Capitals led 4-0 after one.

"When you spot a team three goals early like that, it's pretty hard to come back in this league," Montreal coach Claude Julien said. "They had a good start and we weren't ready for that. Once that game is 4-0, it's pretty hard the rest of the way."

Nathan Walker became the first Australian native to play in the NHL and had a grand debut when he scored Washington's sixth goal late in the second period.

The goal was originally credited to Devante Smith-Pelly, but when the change was announced to the crowd during the third period, his family waved Australian flags in Walker's honour.

"At first I wasn't 100 per cent sure," Walker said of his goal. He felt in somewhat of a daze in his first game.

"The first couple of shifts I didn't know what happened," he said.

Brendan Gallagher beat Holtby early in the second period for Montreal's only goal.

Price allowed four goals on 14 shots. Montoya followed with seven saves.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.