Martin St. Louis' name has been all over the scoresheet lately, and Saturday he wrote his name in the NHL record book: Twice.

The Tampa Bay Lightning sniper won the Art Ross Trophy for second time by notching a goal and an assist in Tampa Bay's 5-3 loss to the Florida Panthers.

He finishes the season with 60 points, three more than Lightning teammate Steven Stamkos. At 37 years of age, he's the oldest man to win the trophy and to lead the NHL in scoring.

Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins finished third in points with 56, tied with Alex Ovechkin of the Washington Capitals. Crosby actually led the league by a wide margin before suffering a broken jaw on March 30, forcing him to miss the last 12 games of the regular season.

"I'd trade that for a chance to play in the playoffs any day,'' said St. Louis.

"You try to finish strong and play the right way. It's something nobody can take away from you. I'm proud. I'm very excited about it. I'm not going to pretend I'm not.''

Gordie Howe of the Detroit Red Wings was 34 when he won his sixth and final Art Ross Trophy in 1963. However, Bill Cook of the New York Rangers  was even older, 36, when he won his second scoring title in 1933 — 15 years before the trophy was inaugurated.

St. Louis, who finished the campaign with five goals and seven points in his last three games, also set a record as the player with the longest gaps between scoring titles — nine years. He won his first one in 2004.

"It's incredble,'' Lightning captain Vincent Lecavalier said. ``He's a smart player. His speed, he's as fast as when he was 22. Thirty-seven is just a number for him.'

"What a feat,'' Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper added. ``I'm really proud to be a part of history.''

But these are bittersweet achievements as the Lightning finished a disappointing 14th in the Eastern Conference, and will miss the playoffs.

The last scoring champ to miss the post-season was Jarome Iginla of the Calgary Flames in 2002.

Ovechkin wins 3rd Richard Trophy

Alex Ovechkin won the Maurice Richard Trophy for the third time in his career, amassing 32 goals in 48 games.

The Washington Capitals' captain and emotional leader was a key cog in his club's strong second half that has made the Caps a Stanley Cup contender.

He's the first three-time winner of the Maurice Richard Trophy, named after the Montreal Canadiens' Hall of Famer. He won it in 2008 with 65 goals, and again in 2009 with 56 tallies.

Blackhawks' goalies claim Jennings

Chicago Blackhawks goaltenders Corey Crawford and Ray Emery combined to win their first William M. Jennings Trophy. The award goes to the team's goalies who post the fewest goals against. The Blackhawks allowed a league-low 102 goals, two fewer the Ottawa Senators.

It was the fourth Jennings honour a Chicago team has earned. Former great Ed Belfour had a hand in the other three (1994-95, 1992-93, 1990-91).

Crawford posted a 19-5-5 record and ranked third in the NHL with a 1.94 GAA, and sixth with a .926 save percentage. Emery set an NHL record by winning his first 12 decisions of the season. He concluded the year 17-1-0, posted a 1.94 GAA, and   had a .922 save percentage.

With files from The Associated Press