How Canadian NHL teams fared last night

The struggling Montreal Canadiens and Calgary Flames, losers of their last three games, were on home ice last night, the only Canadian teams in action. Here's a brief look at how they fared.

Canadiens' slump continues; Flames topple Hurricanes

Montreal's Alex Galchenyuk gave the Canadiens a lead against the Buffalo Sabres, but Montreal fell for the second night in a row, 4-2, their 20th loss in 26 games. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)

The struggling Montreal Canadiens and Calgary Flames, losers of their last three games, were on home ice last night, the only Canadian teams in action. Here's a brief look at how they fared.

Canadiens can't close deal on Sabres

The Canadiens are weary, their fans are weary and the slump that's plagued the team since December continued Tuesday in a 4-2 home ice loss to the Buffalo Sabres.

It was the 20th loss in 26 starts for the Canadiens (24-24-4) who dropped a 4-2 decision for the second night in a row.

Third period goals by Jamie McGinn and Johan Larsson allowed the Sabres (21-26-4) to post their second consecutive victory.

Dale Weise and Alex Galchenyuk helped the Canadiens overcome a first-period deficit. Mike Condon made 28 saves in a losing cause for the Canadiens.

Fire is stronger than wind

The Calgary Flames opened up the second half of their season with a bang, pummeling the Carolina Hurricanes 4-1.

Flames defenceman Dougie Hamilton opened the scoring with a power play goal in the first period. Elias Lindholm tied the game for Carolina 18 seconds later, but at the midway point of the second period, the Flames took over. 

Mark Giordano and Johnny Gaudreau scored second period goals and Sean Monahan gave Calgary a 4-1 lead in the third period.

Monaham ended the game with four points.

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