Boynton, Carcillo allege NHL failed to warn players about risks of fighting

Former NHL players Daniel Carcillo and Nick Boynton are suing the league, alleging it failed to warn players about the long-term risk of brain damage from fighting.

Lawsuit says league did not reveal potential for long-term brain damage

A lawsuit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Minnesota says former NHLer Dan Carcillo, right, suffers from long-term, degenerative brain damage related to fighting. (Jim McIsaac / Getty Images)

Former NHL players Daniel Carcillo and Nick Boynton are suing the league, alleging it failed to warn players about the long-term risk of brain damage from fighting.

The lawsuit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Minnesota says Boynton and Carcillo continued to play hockey despite head injuries. They now both suffer from long-term, degenerative brain damage.

Carcillo, a forward whose nickname was "Car Bomb" for his penchant for delivering hard hits, skated for five NHL teams over nine seasons. He won a Stanley Cup in 2013 with the Chicago Blackhawks.

Boynton, a defenceman who totalled 862 penalty minutes over 605 career NHL games, skated for six teams over 12 years.

Dozens of former players are already part of a similar lawsuit in federal court in Minnesota.

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