Dallas Stars owner Tom Gaglardi to be sentenced for damaging fish habitat

The owner of the NHL's Dallas Stars will be sentenced next month for damaging a fish habitat during renovations to his vacation property in Kamloops, B.C. Tom Gaglardi, who also owns the WHL's Kamloops Blazers, is scheduled to learn his fate on Dec. 12.

Damaged fish habitat in Kamloops during renovations

Tom Gaglardi, centre, the owner of the Dallas Stars and the Kamloops Blazers, is awaiting sentencing after being convicted of harming a fish habitat during construction on his vacation property. (Ronald Martinez)

The owner of the NHL's Dallas Stars will be sentenced next month for damaging a fish habitat during renovations to his vacation property in Kamloops, B.C.

Tom Gaglardi, who also owns the WHL's Kamloops Blazers, is scheduled to learn his fate on Dec. 12.

Gaglardi and his company, Northland Properties, were each convicted in August of two counts of harmful alteration of a fish habitat — 2,400 square metres of shoreline area on Kamloops Lake.

Court heard the damage occurred in 2010 during renovations, done without permits, to Gaglardi's five-bedroom home involving extensive landscaping, a 50-vehicle parking lot and the construction of a boat launch.

Crown lawyer Digby Kier told a sentencing hearing earlier this month that Gaglardi and his company should be ordered to pay a fine of $300,000, the maximum allowed under the law.

Kier said Gaglardi's decisions involved the "blatant, blatant, blatant" actions of a "privileged family."

He said Gaglardi's approach to the renovations was to build first and ask questions later.

Defence lawyer Rob Bruneau has called for a fine in the range of $50,000 to $75,000, saying his client should not be penalized for being wealthy.

A Northland employee testified during the trial that he was ordered to throw his computer in the lake when federal authorities began looking into the alleged environmental infractions.

Jim Parks said he was also told to remove Northland logos from the project's blueprint.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.