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Canucks meltdown: Who's to blame?

A day after a nightmarish 7-4 defeat to the Islanders, adding to a 6-17-3 record in the calendar year, we want to know what change the Canucks could have made (or not made) over the last 12 months to prevent the tailspin.

Vancouver 6-17-3 in 2014

A Vancouver Canucks fan sits in the stands after the team gave up seven goals to the New York Islanders in the third period and lost 7-4 in Vancouver on Monday. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)

The Vancouver area had "#rockbottom" trending on Twitter last night, and unfortunately for Canucks fans, it wasn't because of a certain WWE wrestler's finishing move.

In less than 12 minutes, the Canucks saw a 3-0 lead morph into a 6-4 deficit before the lowly New York Islanders added an empty-net tally to end a waking nightmare for Canucks fans.

It's inexcusable at the best of times to choke away a three-goal lead that late in a game, but as Ryan Kesler told reporters after the game, it wasn't even against the cream of the NHL crop.

“I mean, you have to give them credit, but let’s be honest, that is not one of the top teams in the league,” he said. “They battled hard, they played hard, but being up 3-0 and blowing it like that, it’s embarrassing.

We're not even a full three seasons removed from the team's run to Game 7 of the Stanley Cup final, but those days are a distant memory with how they've performed in 2014, going 6-17-3 in the calendar year.

Those 12 minutes against the Islanders made us think about the last 12 months for the Canucks. There could be plenty of explanations for why the season has gone to mush, but we want you to pick out the one thing the team did (or didn't do) over the last year that most contributed to its current slide.

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