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Markus Naslund had his best NHL season in 2002-03, when he had 104 points with the Vancouver Canucks. ((Jim McIsaac/Getty Images))

Markus Naslund, voted the most outstanding player in the National Hockey League by his peers in 2003, retired Monday after 15 memorable seasons.

The New York Rangers right-winger, who extended his streak of 20-goal seasons to 10 this year, leaves with one year and $3 million US remaining on his contract.

"I would like to sincerely thank [general manager] Glen Sather and the New York Rangers for giving me the opportunity this past season," said Naslund in statement released by the team.

"I would also like to thank the Vancouver Canucks and all of their fans for their support over the 11-plus seasons I was part of their organization, as well as to the Pittsburgh Penguins where I began my NHL career."

Naslund scored one goal and three points in a first-round series loss to Washington in this year's Stanley Cup playoffs to give him 14 goals and 36 points in 52 career post-season games.

The 35-year-old Swede had his best years in a Canucks uniform after joining the team in 1995-96 in a trade that sent fellow forward Alek Stojanov to Pittsburgh.

Naslund reached the 40-goal mark three times in his career and surpassed the 30-goal mark six times, while recording 11 hat tricks. He notched his 800th point on Dec. 27 versus Chicago and on Jan. 17 in Detroit skated in his 1,000th contest.

Naslund was named Canucks captain in 2000-01 and two years later set career-highs in goals (48), assists (56), and points (104) en route to winning the Lester B. Pearson Award as most outstanding player by his NHL brethren. He was also runner-up for the Hart Trophy as NHL MVP.

Naslund's production steadily declined after that season, however, and the 2008-09 campaign was no different, as he put up only 46 points.

Naslund represented Sweden at the 2002 Salt Lake Olympics, picking up two goals and three points in four games. He also competed at the 1996 and 2004 World Cup of Hockey and four world championships (1993, 1996, 1999 and 2002).