boeljon-christel-110726

Wonderful weather welcomed the LPGA pros to Carnoustie for Tuesday's pro-am ahead of the Women's British Open. ((David Cannon/Getty Images))

The Women's British Open is our last major of the year. We are playing at Carnoustie in Angus, Scotland. I love coming to Scotland. It just seems so peaceful here.

Back in 2007, we played the Women's Open at St. Andrews and it such an amazing atmosphere. My grandmother is from Scotland, so it kind of feels like home to me.

Already, it has been an adventure since we have arrived here on Sunday afternoon.

I changed my flight from France, where I played in the Evian Masters, to get in a day earlier and had issues at the airport. The Lufthansa representative was quite rude to me. To make a long story short, I changed my flight over the phone and somehow it was changed properly. But the representative spoke to me like it was my first time travelling. Luckily, I could still get on the flight. I was very thankful to get all of my luggage this time ( see last week ).

I was travelling with my caddie Missy Pederson and fellow pro Beth Bader. We rented a car and, thank goodness, they gave us a standard. We all take driving for granted and really don't think about it. But over here, being on the other side of the road, you definitely have to pay more attention. About 75 miles later, we arrived at Carnoustie to beautiful — unheard of — weather.

I got out to play some of the holes Monday and it is quite the course. The last four holes are pretty challenging. I stood on the tee of the 18th hole and soaked in the scenery. The 18th, you might recall, is the par-4 made famous in 1999 by Jean Van de Velde who, needing only a six to secure the claret jug, clanked a shot off the grandstand, plunked one in the water and chunked into a bunker for a triple-bogey 7 before eventually losing in a four-hole playoff.

I can tell the course will be tough when the wind is blowing. The greens are large but fairly flat, except for a couple of them.

The food in Scotland is quite different. You can get the best Indian and Chinese food over here. And, of course, fries — or as they call them, chips. Whether you order pasta or salad, every meal here comes with chips. At least there are some nice trails here to run on — have to run off all those carbs!

I'm really looking forward to playing this week. After struggling last week in France, I feel being in Grandma's home country that my luck will change.