Free-agent safety Ed Reed is on the verge of becoming a Houston Texan, according to multiple reports.

CBSSports.com reported Wednesday night that a deal was in place, and the NFL Network quoted Reed as saying he was headed to Houston "unless something changes." Neither Reed nor his agent, David Dunn, immediately returned phone messages left by The Associated Press.

The Texans wouldn't confirm the reports, but it looks as if their bold, public courtship of Reed paid off.

Last Thursday, Reed flew to Houston aboard owner Bob McNair's private jet and Reed spent two days meeting with coaches and management. Reed and his representatives left town without a deal and the Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens were reportedly making a pitch to retain him.

But the Texans apparently won out, reviving an otherwise disappointing free-agency period. Houston has lost safety Glover Quin to Detroit and tight end James Casey and linebacker Connor Barwin to Philadelphia since free agency began.

Reed, a nine-time Pro Bowl selection, had dinner with Texans star receiver Andre Johnson and centre Chris Myers, his former college teammates at Miami. Johnson said afterward that he was confident Reed would join the team and after a tense week of waiting for Reed to make up his mind.

Reed has played all 11 of his NFL seasons in Baltimore, where he's the franchise leader in interceptions with 61. His 1,541 return yards with those pickoffs is an NFL career record. He was the NFL defensive player of the year in 2004 and an eight-time All-Pro.

Reed's departure would be one more crippling blow to the Ravens, who've been gutted since winning the Super Bowl.

They traded receiver Anquan Boldin to San Francisco for a sixth-round pick and linebacker Ray Lewis retired and joined ESPN. When free agency began, linebacker Paul Kruger signed with Cleveland and linebacker Dannell Ellerbe left for Miami. Baltimore also released safety Bernard Pollard, a former Texan, and Philadelphia signed cornerback Cary Williams.

Reed has 14 career touchdowns and is the only player in NFL history to score on a punt return, a blocked punt, interception and fumble recovery. He played in all 16 games during the 2012 regular season, finishing with 58 tackles and a team-high four interceptions.

Brian Urlacher, Bears parting ways

Brian Urlacher wanted to re-sign with the Chicago Bears.

Instead, they're parting ways with the veteran linebacker after 13 years.

General manager Phil Emery said Wednesday that the team couldn't agree on a contract with Urlacher, for years the heart and face of the franchise. He is now a free agent after being slowed by a knee problem and then missing the last four games of the season with a hamstring injury.

"We were unable to reach an agreement with Brian and both sides have decided to move forward," Emery said in a statement. "Brian has been an elite player in our league for over a decade. He showed great leadership and helped develop a winning culture over his time with the Bears. We appreciate all he has given our team, on and off the field. Brian will always be welcome as a member of the Bears."

The 34-year-old Urlacher, an eight-time Pro Bowl player, started 180 games from 2000 through 2012, recording a team-record 1,779 tackles. The ninth overall selection in the 2000 draft has 41.5 sacks, 22 interceptions, 16 fumble recoveries and 11 forced fumbles. He was the AP's defensive player of the year in 2005 and helped lead the 2006 team to the Super Bowl.

"Over the last 13 years Brian Urlacher has been an outstanding player, teammate, leader and face of our franchise," chairman George McCaskey said. "As Bears fans, we have been lucky to have such a humble superstar represent our city. He embodies the same characteristics displayed by the Bears all-time greats who played before him and he will eventually join many of them in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. We thank Brian for all he has given our team and our city. He will always be a part of the Bears family. We wish him the very best."

Urlacher told the team's flagship radio station WBBM-AM in Chicago that he was not shocked that it came to this.

"I am definitely not surprised. I kind of had this feeling this whole off-season with the way the whole thing was being handled," Urlacher said. "We made an offer, the Bears asked us to make an offer early, so we did. Never heard back from them. They made an offer, we responded to their offer and it was more like an ultimatum is what it was. It was, Sign this contract or we are going to move on. And I didn't feel like that was the direction I wanted to go."

The parting with Urlacher is just the latest change in what's been a busy off-season for Chicago.

The Bears fired coach Lovie Smith after a second straight late collapse left them out of the playoffs for the fifth time in six years, although they did finish with 10 wins.

They replaced him with the offensive-minded Marc Trestman, hoping he could get the most out of quarterback Jay Cutler, and addressed two major issues in free agency by signing left tackle Jermon Bushrod from New Orleans and tight end Martellus Bennett from the New York Giants.

Trestman also said that the Bears wouldn't change much from the cover-2 scheme they ran under Smith, but he offered what seemed like lukewarm endorsements when asked in recent weeks about Urlacher.

Now, they're parting ways. And the Bears have big holes to fill at the position.

Their only starting linebacker under contract is Lance Briggs. Strong side linebacker Nick Roach — who also saw time in the middle — signed with Oakland.

It's not clear what's next for Urlacher. He had said he wanted to return to the Bears and had posted pictures on Twitter in recent weeks indicating he was working his way back into shape, but whether he will latch on with another team remains to be seen.

His agents did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment.

Urlacher sprained his medial collateral ligament and partially sprained the posterior cruciate ligament in his left knee during the 2011 regular-season finale against Minnesota and hasn't been the same since then.

He barely participated in training camp, had an arthroscopic procedure in mid-August to relieve the swelling, and spent most of the season trying to regain his old form.

Then, he came up lame in coverage on the second-to-last snap of the Bears' overtime loss to Seattle in early December, an injury that ended his season and his tenure with the Bears.

Former Bears defensive end Alex Brown said it was a "sad day" on Twitter and called Urlacher the "best football player I have ever had the pleasure of stepping on the field with."

A safety with lightning speed, the 6-foot-4 Urlacher initially lined up at strong side linebacker for the Bears but lost the job to Roosevelt Colvin. He made the switch to middle linebacker during his first season when Barry Minter was injured and went on to become the NFL's defensive rookie of the year, the start of a long run that saw him anchor a defence that consistently ranked among the league's best.

Now, his run with the Bears is over.

Asked what he'll miss the most about his time in Chicago, Urlacher told WBBM, "The No. 1 thing is my teammates. I am going to miss them the most."