Marcus Vick was permanently dismissed from the Virginia Tech football team on Friday, ending the standout quarterback's turbulent and at-times spectacular four-year tenure with the program.

Vick, the younger brother of Atlanta Falcons star Michael Vick, was let go for what university president Charles Steger termed a "cumulative effect of legal infractions and unsportsmanlike conduct."

The announcement came the same day when it was reported that Vick had been ticketed for speeding and driving with a suspended license near his hometown of Newport News, VA. last month.

Vick was suspended from the team for the entire 2004 season following a pair of earlier brushes with the law. The 21-year-old pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor count of contributing to the delinquency of a minor following a party at his apartment in January 2004 in which underage girls were provided alcohol.

Vick was later charged with reckless driving and possession of marijuana in a separate incident.

He was re-instated to the football team this past spring and put together a strong 2005 season as the Hokies' starting signal-caller, earning first-team All-ACC honors and leading Virginia Tech to an 11-2 record along with a No. 7 final ranking.

However, what turned out to be Vick's final game provided another dose of bad behavior, when he kicked Louisville defensive end Elvis Dumervil in the calf during Monday's 35-24 win over the Cardinals in the Gator Bowl.

Meanwhile, The Roanoke Times reported Friday that Vick was pulled over in Hampton, VA. on December 17 for speeding and was found to have a suspended driver's license.

"The university provided one last opportunity for Vick to become a citizen of the university and re-admitted him in January 2005, with the proviso that any future problems would result in automatic dismissal from the team," said Steger in a statement.

Vick threw for 2.393 yards and 17 touchdowns as a redshirt junior this past season. He added 380 yards and six touchdowns on the ground.

"I'm very disappointed that this didn't have a better ending," Beamer said. "We wanted what's best for this football team and Marcus. I certainly wish him the best."

With the expulsion, Vick can tranfser to a lower-division school, declare his eligibility for the NFL draft, or sign as a free agent with a team in another pro football league.