Canadian government issues guidelines on concussions in sport

The federal government has issued guidelines on concussions in sports to help with decisions on diagnosis management and treatment.

Guide addresses 7 key areas to help with diagnosis management, treatment

Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins shoots during a practice session. Crosby has had multiple concussions, the latest of which happened during this year's Stanley Cup playoffs. (The Associated Press)

The federal government has issued guidelines on concussions in sports to help with decisions on diagnosis management and treatment.

The guideline released on Friday, and developed by Parachute Canada, is intended to ensure that athletes receive appropriate care if there's a potential concussion.

Seven areas are addressed in the guideline including: pre-season education, head injury recognition, on site medical assessment, medical assessment, concussion management, multidisciplinary concussion care and return to sport.

Health Minister Jane Philpott and Sport Minister Carla Qualtrough said in a statement that the guide is meant to help anyone that interacts with athletes, ranging from coaches to health care professionals.

The guideline's aim is to create a more consistent approach to concussions across Canada, something that a number of high profile Canadian sports figures have urged in the past.

Last year, hockey legend Ken Dryden called on sports executives to catch up with the science that shows a relationship with head trauma and long-term brain injuries.

Dryden has long been an advocate for talking about concussions by hosting symposiums across the country.

Former NHL star Eric Lindros has called for a national standard on treatment of concussions that could be taught in schools and help young athletes, coaches and their parents recognize a head injury.

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