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Roy Halladay autopsy reveals morphine, amphetamine in system at time of death: report

The autopsy on former Toronto Blue Jay Roy Halladay revealed that he had morphine and amphetamine in his system at the time of his fatal plane crash in November, according to the report obtained by TMZ.

Former Blue Jays great killed in plane crash off coast of Florida in November

According to a report, Roy Halladay's autopsy revealed morphine and amphetamine in the pitcher's body. (Fred Thornhill/The Canadian Press)

The autopsy on former Toronto Blue Jay Roy Halladay revealed that he had morphine and amphetamine in his system at the time of his fatal plane crash in November, according to the report obtained by TMZ.

Halladay, 40, also had the sedative zolpidem — commonly known as Ambien — in his body when his single passenger plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico on Nov. 7.

TMZ had previously reported that Halladay was flying in an erratic pattern prior to the crash, though the autopsy showed that blunt trauma and drowning were the causes of death.

Roy Halladay, who spent 12 seasons with the Jays, was flying in his two-seater plane over the Gulf of Mexico when it crashed on Tuesday. 1:04

Halladay also suffered from a subdural hemorrhage in the crash, along with multiple rib fractures and lung, liver and spleen injuries, as well as a leg fracture.

The National Transportation Safety Board hasn't identified a cause for the crash. A witness told investigators Halladay's ICON A5 climbed to between 90 and 150 metres before it went into a 45-degree dive and slammed into the water.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, more than 50 ng/ml of zolpidem "appears capable of impairing driving to a degree that increases the risk of a motor vehicle accident." Halladay's blood tested positive for 72 ng/ml.

Halladay pitched for the Blue Jays from 1998-2009, winning the Cy Young award in 2003. He finished his career with the Philadelphia Phillies, where he threw a no-hitter in the playoffs, as well as a regular-season perfect game.

With files from The Associated Press

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