Gavin Floyd breaks bone in right elbow throwing pitch

Atlanta Braves right-hander Gavin Floyd broke a bone his throwing elbow during Thursday night's 3-0 victory over the Washington Nationals.

Righty previously had ligament replacement surgery

Gavin Floyd of the Braves pitches in the sixth inning against the hometown Nationals on Thursday in Washington, DC. He broke a bone in his elbow on his first pitch of the seventh inning. (Mitchell Layton/Getty Images)

Atlanta Braves right-hander Gavin Floyd broke a bone his throwing elbow during Thursday night's 3-0 victory over the Washington Nationals.

Floyd broke the olecranon, the bony tip of the ulna that sticks out behind the elbow, as he made the first pitch of the seventh inning, a curveball that Jayson Werth pulled foul, deep along the left field line.

"It was fine until that last pitch," Floyd said. "I felt a pop. And it wasn't painful, at least."

Floyd will return to Atlanta on Friday to be examined by team doctors. The injury is so rare that neither he nor manager Fredi Gonzalez could provide a timetable for Floyd's return.

"In the big picture, I think he's going to be OK," Gonzalez said.

A similar injury ended the career of Detroit Tigers reliever Joel Zumaya in 2010.

Floyd flexed his arm awkwardly after making the pitch to Werth and was examined by the Braves' trainer. Unable to continue, Floyd left for reliever Anthony Varvaro.

Floyd was making his ninth start since recovering from ligament replacement surgery, but Gonzalez said the two injuries are not related.

Floyd had been working on a two-hit shutout. He threw only 64 pitches, walking one and striking out six to improve to 2-2 and drop his earned-run average to 2.65 in his first season with Atlanta. His career record is 72-72 over 11 seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago White Sox and Braves. 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.