Field of Play: Olympics still belong on CBC | Sports | CBC Sports

Field of Play: Olympics still belong on CBC

Posted: Friday, April 11, 2014 | 02:40 PM

Back to accessibility links
The dramatic gold-medal victory by Hayley Wickenheiser and her women's hockey team in Sochi is among the many thrilling Olympic moments the CBC has brought home to Canadians. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press) The dramatic gold-medal victory by Hayley Wickenheiser and her women's hockey team in Sochi is among the many thrilling Olympic moments the CBC has brought home to Canadians. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)

Beginning of Story Content

It's been a troubling 24 hours. But in this little corner of the world we need to acknowledge that we are still CBC Sports and we have a job to do going forward. 
It's been a troubling 24 hours.

It's been startling for those of us who believe in public broadcasting, and unsettling as many of us consider that our own personal futures are on the line.

But in this little corner of the world we need to acknowledge that we are still CBC Sports and we have a job to do going forward.  

In that understanding we must remain optimistic, creative and steadfast in the belief that the story of sport in this country is a vital and fascinating element of the national landscape.  

Sport has a unifying power which far exceeds many other things.  

The pride and passion that we as Canadians often feel is a direct result of what happens because an athlete wearing our colours excels on the international field of play. Our attraction to not only the result but also the journey is what allows much of our lasting folklore as a people.    

We are still Canada's Olympic broadcaster and we should aim to be that in perpetuity.

Not because the Olympics make us money or because they meet some arbitrary bottom line, but because the Olympics and our reflection of them embodies the story of so many young Canadians from all parts of the country who ambitiously strive to achieve great things.

The public broadcaster has always, and should always, include the Canadian sporting narrative.  

In Sochi, at this year's Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, the CBC connected with more Canadians than ever before. It happened because we developed ground-breaking technology, across all platforms, and employed a spirited, inclusive, effort that saw every branch of the company as well as the resources of our talented broadcast partners come together.

We have served Canadians well and revolutionized the way the Games were delivered to home shores.

But we must resist, in these difficult times, the temptation to pull back or abandon ship entirely.

Canada's athletes, who are in my opinion the best ambassadors the country could possibly know, deserve better. They command their fair share of our attention and someone needs to be there to reflect their remarkable lives unfolding.

So our task is to find new ways and new partners in order to remain who we are and what we set out to do.  

There are so many people out there who believe that our endeavour is worthwhile. We just have to get them onto our team so that this incredible tale of high-performance sport is never diminished for the Canadian public.

Now is our chance to focus.

We need to devote our unique and considerable expertise entirely and without reservation to the broadcasting of the national sporting culture.

History means nothing now.  

While it is true that this company conceived of and pioneered the broadcasting of all sport in this country, and did so with unrivaled distinction, we can't afford to look in the rearview mirror.

We are still CBC Sports, we remain the proud Olympic broadcaster and we have a future ahead of us.

We owe it to Canadians to find a way.

End of Story Content

Back to accessibility links

Story Social Media

End of Story Social Media

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.