London Paralympics: By The Numbers | Sports | CBC Sports

ParalympicsLondon Paralympics: By The Numbers

Posted: Thursday, September 6, 2012 | 11:46 AM

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Former CART and Formula 1 race car driver Alex Zanardi of Italy, who lost both legs in a 2001 crash, hand cycles to a Paralympic gold medal in the men's individual H4 time trial at Brands Hatch in London on Day 7. (Bryn Lennon/Getty Images) Former CART and Formula 1 race car driver Alex Zanardi of Italy, who lost both legs in a 2001 crash, hand cycles to a Paralympic gold medal in the men's individual H4 time trial at Brands Hatch in London on Day 7. (Bryn Lennon/Getty Images)

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There have been seven full days of competition so far at the Paralympic Games in London and here are a few of the numbers that have caught my attention.

There have been seven full days of competition so far at the Paralympic Games in London and here are a few of the numbers that have caught my attention:

19: The number of medals won by Benoit Huot of Longueuil, Que., over his incredible career. So far in London, he has gold, silver and bronze.

4: The age of American Ian Silverman when Huot won his first medal in 2000. Silverman, now 16, was the only one to beat Huot in Wednesday's freestyle race.

16: The age of Montreal swimmer Aurelie Rivard, who won her first-ever Paralympic medal on Wednesday, taking silver in the gruelling 400-metre freestyle in the S10 category.

6: The number of consecutive matches won by Canada's men's wheelchair basketball team led by Patrick Anderson of Fergus, Ont., which needs two more wins to gather in gold.  

69: The number of nations which have won medals at Paralympics so far, compared to 85 at the Olympics. Australia's Tim Matthews wonders if the Paralympics are becoming more global than their Olympic cousin?

469: The number of consecutive matches won by Dutch wheelchair tennis superstar Esther Vergeer, who faces countrywoman Aniek Van Koot in Friday's gold-medal match.

4: The number of consecutive Paralympic gold medals in singles for Vergeer, if she wins.

0: The number of tweets that Chantal Petitclerc, Canada's greatest Paralympian, has made in English since the start of the Games. She is now a coach for Great Britain. If you want to follow her on Twitter, you'll have to do it en francaise @Petitclerc.

14: The number of gold medals won by Petitclerc in her incredible racing career. Miss her.

15: The number of  gold medals won by Switzerland's ageless Heinz Frei, whose latest came in Wednesday's H2 hand-cycling time trial. He will be chasing his 16th on Friday in the road race, which will include Mark Beggs of Trois-Rivieres, Que.

33: The number of career medals (summer/winter) won by Frei who, by the way, is 56 years young. 

2013: The year that Canada will play host to the IPC world swimming championships. Swimming Canada expects to announce the host city by October.

36: The number of  politicians who have been asked to present medals at the Games. Just about that many have been booed.

1: As in Formula 1. That was one of the circuits that Alex Zanardi competed in during his auto-racing career. He lost both of his legs above the knee in a crash at a CART series race in 2001. These days, he is representing Italy in Paralympic hand cycling. On Wednesday, Zanardi won the H4 hand-cycling gold, covering the 16-kilometre course in 24:50.22, which was 17 seconds faster than the next best in a world-class field that included nine-time Boston Marathon wheelchair winner Ernst VanDyk, who wound up 5th.

11.08: How long it took a teenager from Cambridge, England, to run 100 metres into a headwind in the same T43/44 category as Oscar Pistorius. It was a semifinal; the final goes Thursday. Pistorius was a little slower in his semifinal. The final, as they say over here, should be a "cracker."

And finally, a number that will really make you think and maybe even shed a tear.
 
10: The position that Leon Gaysli finished in a hand-cycling time trial race. He was a survivor of the Haiti earthquake that paralysed him below the waist. His wife and eight children died in the tragedy.

It's the kind of fact that stirs me to the soul and reminds me that London is the best place in the world to be right now.

Follow Rob Snoek on Twitter @RobSnoekLIVE

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