Dustin Brown does it all for the Kings | Hockey | CBC Sports

Hockey Night in CanadaDustin Brown does it all for the Kings

Posted: Sunday, June 8, 2014 | 12:21 AM

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Dustin Brown (23) celebrates with his Los Angeles Kings teammates after he scored in double overtime against the New York Rangers during Game 2 on Saturday in Los Angeles, California. (Harry How/Getty Images) Dustin Brown (23) celebrates with his Los Angeles Kings teammates after he scored in double overtime against the New York Rangers during Game 2 on Saturday in Los Angeles, California. (Harry How/Getty Images)

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Just a tip, the New York Rangers might want to keep an eye on Dustin Brown.

The Los Angeles Kings aggressive captain who does it all - chips in on offence, hits like hell and occasionally scores the game-winning goal in double overtime - put his team two games closer to winning its second Stanley Cup in three seasons.
Just a tip, the New York Rangers might want to keep an eye on Dustin Brown.

The Los Angeles Kings aggressive captain who does it all - chips in on offence, hits like hell and occasionally scores the game-winning goal in double overtime - put his team two games closer to winning its second Stanley Cup in three seasons when he tipped a Willie Mitchell shot in at 10:26 of the second overtime period to erase a 2-0 deficit and put Los Angeles ahead 2-0 in the Stanley Cup final.

Mitchell's shot seemed to be going wide, but Brown deflected it home.

"I didn't know where it was going, but if you can get a stick on it you try to," Brown said. "I was lucky to get a little tip on it and re-direct it in. It's a big goal."


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Down, but not out

The Kings were trailing 4-2 entering the third period, but Brown said they were not consumed with trying to put three more pucks past Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist.

"We weren't thinking about scoring the fifth goal; we were thinking about scoring the next goal," Brown said. "I think that is what allows us to have the ability to stay in games even when it looks like we're not worrying about the end game and we are worrying about the next shift."

Added value

The NHL sure gives you your money's worth. Game 2 of the 2013-14 Stanley Cup final marked the third straight season the first two games of the championship series went to overtime. And in this case, double overtime.

Hero stumbles, but doesn't fall

Justin Williams was the hero of Game 1 scoring the overtime winner to give the Kings a 1-0 series lead. In the first period of Game 2, however, things didn't go so well.

First Williams broke in alone six minutes in, but lost the puck before he could shoot. A little bit later he coughed up the puck and his miscue directly led to the Rangers taking a 1-0 lead at 10:48 when Ryan McDonagh blew a shot from the left point past Kings' goalie Jonathan Quick.

Williams bounced back with assists on his team's first three goals.

More McDonagh

The 24-year-old defenceman, who saves some of his best hockey for this time of year, was in on the Rangers' 2-0 goal eight minutes later. He took a shot from the top of the face-off circle that Quick stopped, but New York's Mats Zuccarello popped home the rebound.

Down one? Gulp! Down two? No problem

The Kings have made a habit of staging dramatic comebacks throughout this year's playoffs so when they fell behind 2-0 in the first period, as they did in Game 1, they did not hit the panic button. Rather, they engaged in a comeback.

Grinder Jarret Stoll took advantage of Rangers' goalie Henrik Lundqvist sliding helplessly out of his net on a save and deposited the rebound into the empty cage for his third of the playoffs at 1:46 of the second period.

Kings hit snooze button

The goal by the Kings did not lead to an immediate turn of fortune. Instead, the Rangers came back with a goal to regain their two-goal lead as Martin St. Louis - pointless in his last three games - took a pass from Derek Stepan and one-timed a 20-foot blast past Quick.

Red light fever

Zuccarello took a dumb tripping penalty on Brown that led to Los Angeles scoring a power play goal courtesy of a Willie Mitchell slap shot from the left point. When Zuccarello left the penalty box in shame, New York coach Alain Vigneault kept him on the ice.

Zuccarello repaid his coach by racing into the Los Angeles zone to retrieve a puck behind the net and sent it in front to Derrick Brassard who connected 11 seconds after the Kings power play goal.

Cue the comeback

Down by two goals entering the third, the Kings got on their horse and tied it before the period was eight minutes old. Defenceman Matt Greene took a shot from the point that Dwight King tipped in for his third of the playoffs and then Marian Gaborik scored his playoff-leading 13th of the season in a scramble in front of the New York net.

Girardi bounces back

New York defenceman Dan Girardi coughed up the puck on the winning goal in Game 1, but bounced back with a solid effort in Game 2. He was hurt early in the game and left the bench for a few minutes, but returned to action shortly afterwards. Then in overtime he took a shot off the knee and limped off the ice. Of course, he returned.
 
Rangers roster

Defenceman John Moore, a first round pick of the Columbus Blue Jackets in 2009, returned to the lineup after serving a two-game suspension for his head check to the head of Montreal's Dale Weise.

That meant Raphael Diaz was a healthy scratch. Moore was part of the trade to New York for Gaborik who was a bust in Columbus, but has thrived since being dealt to Los Angeles.

Horsing around

Fans in New York at the Belmont Stakes may have been disappointed they didn't get to see the first Triple Crown winner since 1978, but they quickly turned their attention to hockey and began chanting "Let's Go Rangers! Let's Go Rangers!"

That, of course, was after California Chrome missed on the rare opportunity to win the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes.

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