Maple Leafs return to reality in loss to Rangers | Hockey | CBC Sports

Hockey Night in CanadaMaple Leafs return to reality in loss to Rangers

Posted: Saturday, January 4, 2014 | 11:09 PM

Back to accessibility links
Toronto Maple Leafs goalie Jonathan Bernier skates by back up goalie James Reimer, left, after being pulled from the game against the New York Rangers during the second period Saturday. (Mark Blinch/Canadian Press) Toronto Maple Leafs goalie Jonathan Bernier skates by back up goalie James Reimer, left, after being pulled from the game against the New York Rangers during the second period Saturday. (Mark Blinch/Canadian Press)

Beginning of Story Content

The Maple Leafs were listless to the point of embarrassment in dropping a 7-1 decision to the visiting New York Rangers on Saturday night.




The Toronto Maple Leafs were full marks for their shootout victory over the Detroit Red Wings at the Winter Classic -- a game that made the Guinness World Book of Records for the largest live audience on Wednesday -- but upon their arrival home for the follow-up game, they laid an egg.

The Maple Leafs were listless to the point of embarrassment in dropping a 7-1 decision to the visiting New York Rangers at Air Canada Centre Saturday night.

"We can all share the blame in this one," said Toronto winger Joffrey Lupul. "It's embarrassing. Getting booed off the ice at the end of the first period, the second period and the end of the game, and we deserved it. We were not good in any aspect of the game. We don't feel very good about ourselves right now."

Lupul said sometimes teams suffer losses that the team takes some positives from, but he added, "Tonight we did nothing well. There is not much we can take much from this other than not wanting to have this feeling again."


Download Flash Player to view this content.

Coach Carlyle cross

Carlyle said he expected there may have been some fallout for his team having participated in the Winter Classic Wednesday in Ann Arbor, Michigan, but he was disappointed it carried over through the entire game two days later.

"We thought we may start out flat for a period, but we'd be able to get our legs under us and get our game going to at least be more competitive," he said. "It seemed like the third goal; that was the hockey game. I expected a lot more from our group than we got."

Carlyle said the fact his players had no push back against the Rangers was the most disappointing aspect of the game. He said he thought about pulling starting goalie Jonathan Bernier before he fell behind 5-0, but hoped he'd make it through 40 minutes before replacing him with James Reimer.

Icing on the cake

The Rangers took a 1-0 lead in the second period thanks to a blown call by the officials. The Rangers clearly iced the puck, but the call was waved off. The Rangers then scored on a floater from the point that Bernier couldn't see because he was screened.

Bernier's whiff

Bernier had a good view of a bad angle shot by former Leaf Dominic Moore later in the same period, but it found its way between his legs. It was a bad goal.

More on Bernier

Carlyle makes a huge point of saying his team has two No. 1 goalies, but with Bernier starting his sixth game in a row, it is apparent the coach is picking between he and Reimer. So it must have been painful for Carlyle to have to pull Bernier late in the second period with the Rangers ahead 5-0. It is highly doubtful Carlyle would have left Reimer in for five goals.

More for Moore

The Maple Leafs didn't want to pay checking centre Dominic Moore despite the fact he had 55 points in 101 games with them and have spent the past couple of years trying to replace him. Moore had two goals in New York's win over Toronto Saturday.

Injury woes

Toronto defenceman Carl Gunnarsson took a shot to the head during warm-up, but started the game. It was a shot by teammate David Clarkson that hit the crossbar and deflected and hit Gunnarsson in the ear. In the first period Gunnarsson left the contest with what appeared to be a shoulder injury.

Meanwhile, Clarkson blocked a shot with his left foot in the first period. He left the game, but returned for the second period. He lasted a shift before retiring to the dressing room.

Tough lineup to crack

The Maple Leafs welcomed defenceman Tim Gleason to town after acquiring him in a trade with Carolina, but assigned him to the press box for the game. Seems coach Randy Carlyle didn't want to break up a winning lineup.

Tyler keeps trying

Centre Tyler Bozak had a goal and four points (not to mention the shootout winner in Detroit) in his first game back from an oblique injury that kept him out of 12 games. Against the Rangers he had an assist to keep a six-game points streak alive, but wasn't too noticeable during the game. He was not alone.

Leafs off a roll

The Maple Leafs had points in seven straight games; the first time they have accomplished that since Feb. of 2011.

That's 'fine' with Shanny

Toronto winger Joffrey Lupul avoided a suspension for his head shot on Detroit's Patrick Eaves in the Outdoor Classic, but he was tagged with a $10,000 US fine for his actions by the NHL sheriff in charge of discipline, Brendan Shanahan. The money will be donated to the league's Players' Assistance Fund and brings to a total $530,000 donated by Maple Leafs players this season.

End of Story Content

Back to accessibility links

Story Social Media

End of Story Social Media

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.