Luongo, Sedin talk taking over Canucks series | Hockey | CBC Sports

Hockey Night in CanadaLuongo, Sedin talk taking over Canucks series

Posted: Thursday, April 19, 2012 | 08:56 PM

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Vancouver Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo has been linked to trade rumours involving the Toronto Maple Leafs. (Rich Lam/Getty Images) Vancouver Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo has been linked to trade rumours involving the Toronto Maple Leafs. (Rich Lam/Getty Images)

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With a three-day layoff between games, the Vancouver Canucks may lose some momentum after finally breaking through for a 3-1 victory in their first-round series against the Los Angeles Kings with Daniel Sedin back in the lineup on Wednesday. There also is this matter of goalie Roberto Luongo's future with Canucks.

VANCOUVER - Three days of recovery time will be nice for Daniel Sedin after his return from a concussion, but not necessarily for his Vancouver Canucks teammates.

The Canucks will be unable to ride the momentum after finally breaking through for a 3-1 victory in their first-round series against the Los Angeles Kings with Daniel Sedin back in the lineup on Wednesday.

There also is this matter of goalie Roberto Luongo's future with Canucks. Head coach Alain Vigneault decided to stick with backup Cory Schneider in Game 4, and there has been plenty of speculation that Luongo will be dealt in the summer rather than Schneider.

Luongo has yet to speak to reporters since he was passed over on Wednesday, and it will be interesting to see if he publicly discusses his situation before Game 5 on Sunday.

"He's been great," Daniel Sedin on Thursday, when asked about Luongo. "That's what this team is about. Whoever is in the lineup, we're going to support each other and he's been the same. He's very upbeat and he wants to win the series as bad as anyone else. It's great to see."

A two-concert stint from Coldplay at Rogers Arena on Friday and Saturday means Game 5 of the first-round series, in which the Canucks trail 3-1, won't be played until Sunday (CBC, CBCSports.ca, time TBD).

"It's good for me," Daniel Sedin said. "But as a team, we've been playing two really good road games and we're starting to find our game and play the way we want to play.

"They're still in control. They're up 3-1. Three teams have come back from being down 3-0, so I like their chances better than ours. We'll take it game by game."

As Philadelphia Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren stated earlier this year, that   concussions are like fingerprints in the sense that each one is different for each person, the 31-year-old Sedin was thankful his head injury didn't linger and keep him out as long as some of the other NHL stars this season.

"Every time you wake up with headaches, it's tough," he said. "You think in other cases, [Sidney] Crosby, [Nicklas] Backstrom, Alexander Steen, they were a lot more than I was. For them it must have been really tough. I think I was kind of lucky in that way."

Concussion problems

The concussion problems have continued to hinder the NHL in the 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, the latest from Daniel Sedin's former teammate Raffi Torres, now with the Phoenix Coyotes, on Chicago Blackhawks star Marian Hossa.

"There's a difference between those kinds of hits," Daniel said, in reference to the Torres hit. "I know he left his feet and he's probably going to get suspended for that, but it's those other things you want to get rid of, the intention to injure or the stuff that's not part of hockey, that's what you want to get away from the game.

"Hits are going to happen, it's a physical game. It's a faster game. It's up to the players, the suspensions are not going to solve the problem."

Daniel Sedin made an immediate impact for the Canucks. He pumped some life into a power play that was 0-for-14 in the first three games against the Kings. The Canucks went 2-for-3 in Game 4, including a goal from Daniel's brother, Henrik.

"[Daniel is] an elite athlete, a world-class player and when the game is on the line those guys always seem to be able to raise their games to another level," Canucks associate coach Rick Bowness said.

"He had a lot more flow to his game as it went on. He was cautious early, but then he felt comfortable, which elite athletes can find quicker. And it was spectacular again to watch those two get going. You get Henk back 100 per cent with Danny. Again, they are world-class elite players and they'll find a way to get it done."

Daniel Sedin was coming off a 27-day layout after he took an elbow in the head from Chicago Blackhawks defenceman Duncan Keith, who was suspended five games for the headshot.

After a setback last week, in which he didn't feel right after a hard skate with his teammates, the Canucks left wing started to feel better last Sunday. So he decided to rejoin his teammates in time for Game 4 of the series.

He hopped over the boards for 22 shifts and 19 minutes and 33 seconds of ice time, and was solid after only one practice with his teammates on Tuesday.

"It's my goal," he joked, when asked if practice was overrated. "You need to practice to keep that level up, but one or two games you can get by not practicing.

"I wasn't worried about my head. It was more the pace of the game and getting a feel of the puck. My head was fine and I didn't really worry too much about that." 

And how did he feel the next day?

"Probably more tired today, but we had a long flight last night and came in late," he said. "We got a few good days now where we can practice hard and be ready for Sunday."

Even if the Canucks may have lost some momentum after their break-through win.

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