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November 2011 Archives

Most Montreal taxpayers face 3% hike

Mayor Gérald Tremblay presents a budget that will mean an increase for most taxpayers of about $95 a year. The mayor also wants to cut the pension rolls by $50M.

(photo:CBC)                                                                                                                                                                                                          as "reasoThumbnail image for mtl budget.jpgnable".  Opposition Executive committee member Michael Applebaum is describing the 2012 budget as "reasonable".

Opposition councillor Peter McQueen tells us the city should do more - perhaps cut the pensions of retired employees who don't live in the city. 

We hear from the chief negotiator for the city's blue collar workers and get reaction from the mayor of Westmount, Peter Trent, as well as from our listeners.

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Farm Panel Tuesday November 29th

Our weekly round table on farm issues with dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu, beef and sheep producer Bob Laberge, and agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard.

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Canada's environmental reputation in Durban

Environment Minister Peter Kent  (Fred Chartrand/Canadian Press)

KENT.jpgDelegates from around the world are gathering in Durban South Africa for a two week summit on Climate change. They are trying to work out a binding treaty to reduce Greenhouse gas emissions.

They are also trying to resolve differences between rich and poor countries on how to fight climate change.

 Canada continues to be criticized for abandoning previous commitments.

 The Canadian government says these targets make no sense-  if the US isn't on side.

We hear from Environment Minister Peter Kent, Steven Guilbeault - the deputy director of Equiterre and the NDP Environment Critic.

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You can read more about the story here:

Lack of CPE spaces for low income families

LESSARD.gifDr. Richard Lessard's report found that income inequality affects health and access to services in Montreal.

 

 

 

 

Early access to public daycare helps children from low income families do better in school and live healthier lives.

Here in Quebec, children from poor neighborhoods have a harder time getting access to public, seven dollar per day, day care.

So should children from low income families get priority access to spots in pubic day care centres. Or would that be unfair to other children?

We asked Radio Noon listeners.

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THE NOVEMBER NEWS QUIZ
 Picture this scene - there I am, the producer, at a pet store in Alexis Nihon, holding a dog training clicker in one hand, a stuffed squeaky toy in the other. Beside me, a young store clerk also with a squeaky toy.

 "1-2-3, Go" -- we squeak, click and listen. Trying to determine the loudest toy and the fastest. Yes, my many years of journalism has come to this.

 We love our monthly news quiz on Radio Noon, but the participants are of the view that the old monkey toy is slower than the clickers -- and so in the name of fairness, out with the monkey and in with the squeaky ring.

 On the last Friday of every month we bring together four CBC personalities to tackle our quiz.

 On Nov 25, NANCY WOOD, Enquête investigative journalist and former Radio Noon host, and Daybreak's SHAWN APEL are facing off against Homerun producer NATHALIE WALTHER and Executive News Producer PETER JOHNSON.

 In the excitement of answering, NATHALIE literally throws her squeaky toy into the air. It lands under the table.  LINDSAY, our researcher, runs in with a replacement toy. At another point BERNIE discovers he doesn't have page 5, so we scramble in with another page 5.

 At the end, it all comes down to the last question and Nancy's answer "Sorel", (hometown of filmmaker Danic Champoux) producing our first ever News Quiz tie!

 GIVE OUR SAMPLE QUESTIONS A TRY...

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Radio Noon November News Quiz

Bernard St-Laurent welcomes CBC personalities Nancy Wood, Shawn Apel, Peter Johnson and Nathalie Walther back to our studio for a challenging round of questions.

Sample Questions:
1. What Quebec municipality demanded the return of the Canadian flag at its council meetings?

2. Who's the newest Muppet?

3. Who's playing in the Vanier Cup?

Answers:
1. St-Denis-de-Brompton

2. Walter

3. Laval and McMaster 

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Parizeau says Quebec should get more out of Plan Nord

The former premier sets off renewed debate on the Liberals' massive development plan for the north of Quebec. He says Quebec should get more than royalties.

 

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Quebec MP tries to prevent export of bulk water

Francis Scarpaleggia, who represents the riding of Lac-St-Louis for the Liberals, is trying for the third time to prevent the bulk export of Canadian freshwater. He talks to Radio Noon's Bernard St-Laurent prior to the House of Commons' first hour debate on his private member's bill.

We also hear opposing views from McGill economist Thomas Velk. 

Our callers are divided on this ...and impassioned!

Take a listen.  

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Bilingualism under debate?

Is bilingualism as important to Canadians now as it has been in the past?

We hear from a Montrealer who hasn't 'bothered' to learn French, Jack Jedwab of the Association for Canadian Studies fills us in on the lack of bilingual progress by Anglophones outside Quebec, and our listeners provide a wide range of viewpoints.

 

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"The Weasel", a double life inside the mob

On Tuesday's Radio Noon, we meet Marvin Elkind who spent years informing on the mob as he ran errands and drove around organized crime's kingpins, mainly in Ontario, and New York, but also in Quebec.

We also meet award-winning journalist Adrian Humphreys who tells the Weasel's story in his latest book. 

Ironically, the Weasel was a nickname he acquired for his style of boxing and not for his years of tipping off the police, or "coppers", as he calls them.

 

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Farm Panel Tuesday November 22

Dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu and agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard are on hand for our weekly round table on farm issues with host Bernard St. Laurent. Sheep and beef producer Bob Laberge is out of the mix this week due to illness.

 

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MOST TEXTS-AND-CALLS TOPIC OF THE WEEK: LA CAISSE LANGUAGE CONTROVERSY
 The two executives hired to run La Caisse's real-estate arm was the hot button story of the week.


Thumbnail image for caisse-depot-cdp_.jpg

(photo courtesy: PC)

 Employees at the giant pension fund manager complained about meetings in English after two Anglophones were recruited for top positions at Ivanhoe-Cambridge.
 LaPresse columnist PATRICK LAGACÉ told host BERNARD ST-LAURENT he couldn't believe this was happening in 2011. Bernie asked him what was his initial reaction?

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 By mid-week La Caisse announced the pair would be enrolled immediately in French Immersion.

 

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Storm over NDP MP's F-word tweets

Radio Noon host Bernard St-Laurent interviews NDP MP Pat Martin who swore in his tweets about the Harper government using closure to end debate in parliament.

While Martin says he doesn't regret using such charged language, he answers a listener's question by saying he wouldn't do it again.

 

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Sally Armstrong on the global challenges facing women

Human rights activist and acclaimed journalist Sally Armstrong joins Radio Noon to take calls from listeners and talk about the difficulties women are trying to overcome, especially in areas of conflict.

 

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David Phillips on the weather ahead

Senior Climatologist with Environment Canada, Dave Phillips, takes questions from Radio Noon callers, along with host Bernard St-Laurent.

One listener wants to know about "the usefulness of manually manipulating the weather, such as during the Chinese Olympics, and the possible dangers?"

Take a listen...

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Caisse unilingual execs cause a stir

caisse-depot-cdp_.jpg

(photo: archives PC)

Employees of La Caisse de dépôt et placement have gone public with their complaints after the giant pension-fund manager hired two unilingual anglophones to head up its real estate-arm, Ivanhoe-Cambridge.

We have excerpts from Question Period in the National Assembly and a Radio-Canada interview with Daniel Fournier, Executive Vice-President at the Caisse.
LaPresse columnist Patrick Lagacé adds his voice plus our callers wade in...  

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Farm Panel Tuesday November 15

Dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu, sheep and beef producer Bob Laberge and agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard join Bernard St-Laurent for their weekly round table on farm issues.

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Should Occupy Montreal stay?

Occupy Mtl Nov 15.jpgAfter New York City police moved in overnight on the Occupy Wall Street encampment, Radio Noon samples reaction in Quebec. We hear from callers as well as protesters from the Montreal movement.

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Options for changing school


Options 1 group in studio.jpg

Recommendations for making school better...

Options 1 High School teacher Michael Sweet and three of his students (Leslie, Georgia and Hussain) come to our studio to share their suggestions for improving school.

Here they are talking with host Bernard St-Laurent.  

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Legault launches his political party

Coalition Avenir Quebec is a new political party on the Quebec landscape. François Legault doesn't want to be boxed in by old definitions: left/right, sovereignist/federalist.

 

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Student Protest.jpgMOST CALLS AND TEXTS: THE STUDENT PROTEST
 Thursday's student strike did, indeed, strike a chord with listeners. Students took to the streets to protest against the Charest government's decision to increase student tuition by $325 a year, for the next five years.
 
 We got many more calls and texts on this topic than anything other subject all week.

  Dawson Student Union President AUDREY DEVEAULT started things off: "Education is not a product. It's a right. So everyone should have access to it. No matter what background they come from."

 Teachers, students, former students, business people, supporters, and critics all phone in...
 
 These quotes from our text line give you an idea of our 'on air' debate:

 "My eyes rolled back as far as I could go ...I have many friends at Dawson that own the new iPhone/iPad which costs more than $325. This is a generation of entitlement..."

 "My daughter's boyfriend had to miss class because he didn't have money for his bus pass! He doesn't have an iPhone!"
 
 "Start by cutting the ridiculously high salaries of university administrators making $400,000."

 "A simple question for those who support raising tuition: how do you expect an indebted, Recession-plagued generation to pay into retirement."

 A CEGEP teacher calls in, reminding listeners that students face costs for books and transportation. Plus, she says students from the regions frequently have to move to continue their education.

THE MCGILL CLASH
 Protesters say Montreal police over-reacted late Thursday afternoon as they moved to break up a demonstration in McGill. After some students staged a sit-in in the principal's office, others formed a human chain around the building.
 
 TOM who was a participant in that chain called in during our Friday show with his eye-witness account. He says the police had their bicycles at their sides and then swung them at the protesters.

Here's an excerpt of his conversation with LOREEN PINDERA, sitting in for BERNARD
ST-LAURENT as host: 

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McGill has announced it's launching an investigation.

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Police and protesters clash at McGill

The Thursday student strike turned ugly outside the James administration building at McGill.
An associate professor says he was a bystander, going to get his kids at daycare when he was pepper-sprayed and clubbed by police.

We hear from a spokesperson for the police department and a participant in 'the human chain' that formed around the administration building phoned in to share his experience.

Loreen Pindera is sitting in as our host replacing Bernard St-Laurent. 

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Remembering Canada's war dead

From the National War Memorial in Ottawa to the official ceremonies in Montreal, Radio Noon listeners pay their respects to those who've died serving their country.

Loreen Pindera is sitting in as host for Bernard St-Laurent. 

 

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Students strike to protest against fee hikes

A massive walk-out by post-secondary students across Quebec sets the phones ringing at Radio Noon.

 

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Joyce Napier on American politics and overheard comments

Radio-Canada's Washington bureau chief sits down with host Bernard St-Laurent to take calls and talk about the allegations against Republican candidate Herman Cain, President Barack Obama's re-election chances and any fallout from the embarrassing comments about Israel's Benjamin Netanyahu by the French president and Obama.

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ADQ-Legault talks confirmed

li-adq-deltell-merger-620.jpgADQ leader Gérard Deltell has sent a letter to party members saying informal talks to form a partnership have been underway with François Legault's coalition movement. Deltell says formal negotiations will begin after Legault's official party launch on November 14th.


Former ADQ MNA Marie Grégoire and panellist on RDI's Club des Ex talks with host Bernard St-Laurent about the possible political implications.

 

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Farm Panel Tuesday November 8

Dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu from her sunny back-field picnic spot in Rawdon, beef and sheep producer Bob Laberge from his Danville farm, and agricultural communication specialist Hugh Maynard from La Pocatière, all talk farm issues with host Bernard St-Laurent.

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Greece, Italy, the Euro: Questions for Paul Martin

Radio Noon listeners put their questions about the Eurozone crisis to the former prime minister and finance minister - who's now a member of an Internal Monetary Fund advisory board.

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White Poppy Campaign comes to Montreal

Radio Noon listeners wade into the debate on the white poppy campaign which was launched Friday morning in Montreal. 

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Marsden launches 'Fools Rule'

Gazette investigative reporter William Marsden comes to studio to talk about his book on 'the failed politics of climate change'.

 

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banner_logo.pngCBC AT 75: Wednesday, November 2, 2011
      On our CBC memory show we go to the front lines of history. We replay for our listeners some amazing tape of gunfire recorded during the OKA CRISIS of 1990.

      It is gripping.
 
     CBC Reporter LAURENT LAVIGNE is on the air, under fire, describing the scene. You can hear the gunshots and the confusion around him. Laurent tells Host BARBARA SMITH that "I'm just going to step behind a tree" to ensure he doesn't get hit.  

      The tape takes you right there at the most intense moment of the stand-off between the natives and the police.

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      LOREEN PINDERA also reported on that 76-day seige. On Wednesday she reminds Radio Noon Host BERNARD ST-LAURENT that the Oka crisis was one of the first stories where cell phones really came into play.  
      Those shoe-box-sized phones let us be in the middle of the action and share that front-line view of history-in-the-making with our listeners.

      We also play on the program a charming memory from CBC documentary producer TERENCE MCKENNA** about an early "scoop" from his beginning days as a journalist in Montreal:

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      We are very touched by the phone calls on Wednesday. People tell us they learned to speak English listening to CBC Radio, or French, thanks to Radio Canada. A psychologist says we helped her through a difficult year.

 

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Would Quebecers vote for a woman as premier?

After a PQ MNA calls on his leader Pauline Marois to step down because he says many Quebecers won't vote for a woman, Radio Noon looks at the life of women in politics.

We talk with Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party of Canada, who says people will vote for a candidate they trust whether they're male or female. But she adds there's sexism in political life. She tells host Bernard St-Laurent when she entered politics she was surprised to hear attacks on her appearance. 

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Occupy Quebec told to leave

The protest movement gets told to decamp after a fire broke out on Tuesday near one of the tents on the Quebec City site. Mayor Régis Labeaume, citing safety issues, says they have until the end of the day to go.  

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Quebecers share memories of CBC

Listeners call in to talk about their favourite programs and moments as the CBC marks its 75th anniversary.

We replay the electrifying audio of CBC reporter Laurent Lavigne under fire at Oka.

CBC reporter Loreen Pindera talks about the impact of Barbara Frum as a radio role model for young women considering careers in journalism.

Documentary maker Terence McKenna talks about an early scoop in his beginning days at the CBC.

Callers thank us for helping them through difficult days, or for opening up the world to them; others tell us they learned to speak English listening to CBC, or French, thanks to Radio Canada.

Have a listen... 

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Farm Panel Tuesday November 1

Our weekly round table on farm matters with dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu, sheep and beef producer Bob Laberge, agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard, and of course, our host Bernard St-Laurent.

 

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Cash or a tax record?


On Nov. 1, all restaurant sales will be a matter of record. Every cash register must be outfitted with equipment to track all transactions. The Quebec government estimates it's losing $150M a year to tax evasion.

Many callers phone in to say the taxman isn't treating them fairly.

 

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