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September 2011 Archives

Farm Panel Tuesday September 27

Dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu, sheep and beef producer Bob Laberge, and agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard join Bernard St. Laurent for our weekly round table on farm issues.

 

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Radio Noon's News Quiz returns for the fall

Join Host Bernard St. Laurent as he takes on the role of Quiz Master - testing the news knowledge of CBC Quebec personalities: Nancy Wood, Sue Smith, Peter Johnson and Steve Rukavina.

Jacques Duchesneau was a candidate for Mayor of Montreal in 1998. Who else was in the running? Listen in and test your own news memory....

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Flag bill flap with a particular Quebec take

Conservative MP John Carmichael explains to Radio Noon why he's pushing his private member's bill to make it illegal to bar someone from flying the Canadian flag.

The opposition thinks the flag flap over the Maple Leaf is a diversionary tactic during tense economic times.

Our listeners in Quebec wade into the debate - adding the mix of national unity issues.

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Protesters in wheelchairs demand greater metro access

A handful of protesters who use wheelchairs gather at the Place des Arts metro station to back their call for more wheelchair-friendly subway stops. Only seven stops are fully accessible.

The vice-chair of the STM says he understands their frustration but would need more money from the province to move more quickly to retro-fit other stations. About half a dozen stations will be renovated over the next couple of years, according to Rotrand.

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Have you lost your trust in politicians?

Jacques Duchesneau testified before a committe of the National Assembly today. The head of the Anti collusion squad was there to answer questions aoubt his report.

It alleges links between organized crime, entrepreneurs and the illegal funding of political parties.

Today we asked you: Have you lost your trust in politicians?

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What is a university degree worth?

University degrees are more and more expensive and jobs are hard to find. How much can a university degree help you find a job?

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A bridge too costly to close

If the Champlain bridge had to be shut down for a long period of time - a study shows that Montreal area manufacturers could lose close to six hundred million dollars and manufacturers in other parts of the province would lose an extra 150 million.

The study was conducted by the McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics.

Andre Girard, the vice-president of communications at the federal bridge corporation, spoke to Bernard St. Laurent.

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Protecting future pets

Last week the city of Toronto passed a bylaw that forces pet shops to get their cats and dogs from animal shelters. The goal is to attack people who mass-produce animals for profit.

Now a similar law could be coming to Quebec.

The SPCA in Outaouais is going to ask the city of Gatineau to consider implementing a law like this. The mayor of Gatineau has said that they will look into the idea if an official request is made.

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Palestinians make UN bid

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas seeks full Palestinian membership at the United Nations. Our listeners debate the pros and cons of this move.

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Mourani in the running for Bloc Leader

Ahuntsic MP Maria Mourani has thrown her hat into the ring to be the new leader of the Bloc Québecois. She tells host Bernard St-Laurent she doesn't believe in the 'cult of the personality' but wants to head up a party that's open and democratic.

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Paradis says the anti-crime bill is aimed at "dangerous offenders"

Quebec's top federal cabinet minister defends the anti-crime legislation introduced this week. Christian Paradis says the Harper government wants to ensure that dangerous criminals are off the streets and behind bars.

A lawyer calls in to say the tough-on-crime measures will clog the legal system. And the head of the Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies (the umbrella group for agencies devoted to helping women and female youth in conflict with the law) says the bill seems "designed to whip up a frenzy of fear of crime that really doesn't exist." 

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Deciding who gets fertility treatments

Some doctors say obese women should not be candidates for fertility treatments. They say severely overweight women face more medical risks, while others argue that's discrimination.


McGill ethicist Margaret Somerville and two doctors in the fertility field take on the issue along with our listeners.

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Beaudoin worries about public's distrust in politicians

Louise Beaudoin talks about her new status as an independent MNA and the high level of public distrust in politics as the National Assembly resumes sitting in Quebec City.

We also hear from our legislative reporter, Tim Duboyce, on the big issues facing the Charest government.

 

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A new study links diabetes and Alzheimer's

We hear from a Montreal neurologist and Alzheimer's researcher on the latest findings in a Japanese study.

Dr. Ziad Nasreddine says the researchers followed more one thousand people 60 years and older for fifteen years. The study found that subjects with diabetes at 60 were twice as likely to develop dementia compared to those people who did not have the diabetes

He sees it as a call to a healthy lifestyle and a need to treat diabetes aggressively.

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Farm Panel Tuesday September 20

Dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu, beef and sheep producer Bob Laberge and agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard gather for their weekly round table on farm matters with Host Bernard St. Laurent.

We hear about a bumper blueberry crop, intoxicated animals (!) and soggy ground woes to mention just a few of the topics covered.

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NDP's Thomas Mulcair still weighing leadership bid

As parliament resumes business as usual, Outremont MP Thomas Mulcair talks about the leadership race, the party's membership rules and the Official Opposition's priorities in Ottawa. 

We also hear from Romeo Saganash who's the party's second declared candidate and we have an excerpt from the party's interim leader, Nycole Turmel, paying her respects to the late Jack Layton.

 

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Mercier Bridge inspection reports released

Worries about the Mercier Bridge forced its sudden closure earlier this year. The Quebec government has released its inspection reports into the bridge as a nod to its new policy of more openness.

 

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Boisclair defends his advisory job with Questerre

Former PQ leader André Boisclair explains why he has signed on as an adviser to the board of the Alberta-based energy company. Questerre Energy has been involved in shale gas exploration in Quebec.

 

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Charest remains opposed to a public inquiry

Jean Charest is in damage control. The premier along with his transport and public security ministers met with reporters to respond to a leaked report that alleges there's a network of corruption involving politicians, engineers, government employees, contractors, biker gangs and organized crime.

Charest says no government has done more to fight collusion than his adminstration.

A new poll says 77 per cent of Quebecers want an inquiry and 59 per cent suspect the government has something to hide. We talk with pollster Christian Bourque.

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Leaked collusion report paints devastating picture

Without naming names, a report from the anti-collusion squad in Quebec tells of a tainted system which includes contractors, engineers, biker gangs, organized crime, politicians and bureaucrats.

We take Transport Minister Pierre Moreau's answers to reporters live and we hear from PQ Critic Stéphane Bergeron who's demanding a public inquiry and we also talk to investigative author André Cédilot who's covered organized crime for years.

Many of our callers are outraged.

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Farm Panel Wednesday September 14

Dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu, sheep and beef producer Bob Laberge and agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard join Bernard St-Laurent for our weekly round table on farm matters.

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Quebec government defends anti-corruption squad

The Charest government is denying a newspaper report that says more than a dozen former police officers are leaving or thinking of leaving the squad because they don't want to take civil service entrance tests.

Cabinet members say it's just a matter of technicalities while the opposition questions the government's commitment to the squad.

The head of the squad tells us it's all about permanent status and investigators can choose to stay on contract. 

Our listeners weigh in. 

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Dawson marks shootings anniversary with Peace Garden

PEACE GARDEN.jpg

DAWSON CEREMONY

From an elementary school's choir to the sound of the bagpipes, Radio Noon with Bernard St-Laurent follows the ceremonies at Dawson College marking the fifth anniversary of the shootings at the CEGEP.
18 year old student Anastasia De Souza was killed while 19 others were wounded during the noon hour rampage. Five years later, the faculty and students of Dawson have turned that horrifying event into a beautiful garden dedicated to peace.

Listen as Radio Noon mixes the memories of Montrealers and former students with today's commemoration ceremonies. You'll hear student garden volunteers, professors, Dawson head Richard Fillion, Montreal Mayor Gérald Tremblay, Montreal Police Chief Marc Parent, a United Nations reverend, and an Algonquin elder.        
 

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A juvenile football coach warns about "head first" attitudes

A Bishops football player is in a medically-induced coma after a Saturday game. The defensive end is said to be in critical condition but stable.

Sports injuries are making coaches, players and families take note of the consequences of hits.

We hear from a juvenile football coach who thanks his medic for making him more aware of the dangers. He says attitudes have changed over the past nine years, yet he says kids still think 'head first' is the way to go. He says they probably have a borderline or mild concussion or two a game.

We also hear from a hockey referee from Westmount who says they have new guidelines in place this year to limit hits to the head.

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Quebec lawyer says bill banning ticket resales "like Prohibition"

Hearings are underway in Quebec into Bill 25 which clamps down on the resale of event tickets online by third parties.

Radio Noon host Bernard St-Laurent interviews lawyer Julius Grey who's representing one of the resale companies. He likens the bill to "Prohibition".

We also hear from André Ménard, the co-founder and vice-president of Spectra and the Montreal Jazz Festival, who says we aren't talking about the folkloric selling of tickets by scalpers on the sidewalk, but by big businesses. 

 

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Quebec Muslims decry discrimination since 9/11

We hear from a Montreal Iman and from Muslim callers who describe how their lives changed for the worse a decade ago.

A former Canadian diplomat talks about his life as an al-Qaeda captive and the role religion played in his kidnapping.

CBC TV's Bob McKeown joins us to talk about his 'fifth estate' report on the last days of Bin Laden. He laments the effect on journalism in the United States in the wake of the terrorist attacks.

 

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Poll: Quebecers favour 'merit pay' for teachers

A new poll shows that two thirds of Quebecers are in favour of paying teachers according to their performance. We hear from the Montreal Economic Institute, the organization behind the poll and a teachers' representative.

We also got many callers including teachers past and present. Some asked, "Why us? What about principals?"

   

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Dalai Lama discusses post 9/11 world in Montreal

Prominent spiritual thinkers, including the Dalai Lama and Robert Thurman from Columbia University gather in Montreal to talk about the role of religion as the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks looms. They discuss ways to bring about peace and draw people together.

Our callers are strongly divided, either seeing religion as a unifying force or an obstacle to world peace. 

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Farm Panel Tuesday September 6

Dairy farmer Jeannie Neveu, beef and sheep producer Bob Laberge, and agricultural communications specialist Hugh Maynard joins Radio Noon host Bernard St-Laurent for their weekly get-together to talk about farm matters.

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Mayor Labeaume unveils Quebec City arena details

Our callers and Quebec City opposition councillors may not be impressed with the proposed deal with the media giant, Quebecor, for a new facility in the provincial capital but organizers of the world famous Peewee tournament certainly are.

Learn all the ins and outs as Bernard St-Laurent fields reaction and interviews both opponents and proponents of the deal.

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New Communications Director for the PMO

Federal opposition parties say Prime Minister Harper should never have hired his new communications director.

Angelo Persichilli doesn't speak French...and he's voiced some controversial opinions about Quebec in the past.

We spoke to Radio-Canada reporter Daniel Thibeault and Guy Caron, president of the NDP Caucus in Quebec.

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Selling your home: DuProprio vs. an agent

Last year about 80,000 Quebecers bought or sold a home using the services of a real estate agent and about 50,000 others did it on their own.

We asked our listeners: Do you still need a real estate agent?

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McGill support staff strike

McGill University students are dealing with a strike. McGill's non-academic employees are picketing outside McGill right now.


We spoke with students, the union and management to get a deeper understanding of the situation.

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