Reclaiming, retelling and revisioning Indigenous stories

The relationship between Indigenous people and the movies dates back to the very start of movies themselves.
An ensemble cast of Indigenous musicians and actors from the musical documentary The Road Forward by Marie Clements. (Rosamond Norbury)

The relationship between Indigenous people and the movies dates back to the very start of movies themselves. But as cinema increased in popularity, becoming one of western culture's primary storytelling media, stories about Indigenous peoples became filtered through a non-Indigenous lens.

Jesse Wente, culture columnist for  Unreserved and head of the Toronto International Film Festival Cinematheque, shares us how our stories are now being told by ourselves.

Benjamin Ross Hayden, a Métis filmmaker, wrote and directed The Northlander on a micro-budget of just $250,000. 
But that didn't stop it from taking home best screenplay in Alberta for that province's film and television awards, and being nominated for best makeup at the Canadian Screen Awards.

Three sisters and a brother, adopted as infants into separate families across North America, meet for the first time in Birth of a Family, a documentary by award-winning filmmaker Tasha Hubbard

The Road Forward is a groundbreaking Indigneous film told through interviews and musical sequences. Marie Clements shares what it was like to make this film that will premiere at Hot Docs in Toronto.