Indigenous Reads panel discussion on Son of a Trickster by Eden Robinson

Teenage angst and tricksters are the focus of our latest Indigenous Reads choice. Our radio book club invites you to read along to books written by Indigenous writers. Son of a Trickster is the latest novel from Haida author Eden Robinson.
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Teenage angst and tricksters are the focus of our latest Indigenous Reads choice. Our radio book club invites you to read along to books written by Indigenous writers. Son of a Trickster is the latest novel from Haida author Eden Robinson. 

We meet Jared - a teen pothead who drinks too much and whose mom is more than a ittle bit crazy. While Jared has to deal with violence and family breakups - he also has a big heart, often taking care of those who have hurt him.

On our panel is: Broadcast journalist David Wiwchar from Port Alberni, B.C.; Tiar Wilson, a journalist who calls Opaskaywayk Cree Nation home; and Monique Woroniak, an ally living on Treaty One territory and a mighty librairian.

Monique Woroniak works as a librarian with the Winnipeg Public Library. (Facebook)

Monique Woroniak

"It's one of those books where a lot of things happen - both internally in the character's heads and what they're going through and just externally. There's a lot of plot points … I felt tired reading it cause I was kind of travelling along with Jared, the main character, the 16-year-old, who goes through so much. Even in the space of 12 hours. He'll go through more than some of us will go through in a week."

David Wiwchar is a broadcast journalist in Port Alberni, B.C. (Facebook)


David Wiwchar:

"Growing up in First Nations communities, you'd wake up on mattresses after parties and you know, it was a part of growing up. It wasn't a negative thing back then. And certainly we had a lot of humour about it. A lot of sarcasm, a lot of joking around after. Sure those things are portrayed negatively in a lot of areas of society and there's a lot of negative aspects to it. But when you're a teenager and you're in it, I don't think there's a lot of difference between Native and non-Native communities. You're a party kid, and having fun and joking around and that's what life is when your 15, 16 years old."

Tiar Wilson is a communications specialist and journalist.

Tiar Wilson:

"As we move forward, I think we should more of this kind of writing because a lot of people, like myself and many others out there, are trying to - as they get educated and start to meet other people - they want to live their life more whole, in a better way. When you bring this stuff to light, it gets other people thinking. Son of a Trickster, it's harsh and sometimes reading it hurts but it's done truthful and honestly."