Creating strong passwords with security expert Roger Danby

Protecting your identity online has never been more important. But one expert says that many Canadians aren’t doing enough to protect themselves when it comes to creating strong passwords on the internet.
“Every time I have to change my password for various devices, I feel like Columbus setting out on a dark and perilous journey. Usually I take great care to write down the password. In a notebook. I then forget where I put the notebook.” Michael Enright, The Sunday Edition, March 11, 2018 (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Protecting your identity online has never been more important. But one expert says that many Canadians aren't doing enough to protect themselves when it comes to creating strong passwords on the internet.

Our very own Pat Kelly sat down with security expert and cryptographer Roger Danby, from the Vancouver technology firm Securifex, to find out what Canadians should be doing to protect themselves online.

According to Danby, hackers are looking for a few things when they choose to target an individual: "They're looking for quick access, a quick fix, and to nab that cash."

In order to avoid being a target, Danby recommends that you approach creating passwords like you would cooking a stew. "If you know how to make a good stew, then you know what it takes to create a strong password," he said.

Danby uses stew as an analogy for a good password because they both require a variety of ingredients: "Letters, upper-case, lower-case, numbers, ampersands, and don't forget punctuation." Danby said that these are the essential ingredients to a password.

Canadians shouldn't "use a password like 1234," Danby said. Instead, they should use a strong password like "Platypus3#4$55beak," which he personally uses for his online banking.

To hear more security tips from Danby, and to see if he can guess Pat Kelly's password on the air, listen to the full interview.