The Sunday Edition

The Beaver Hall Group - an Alisa Siegel documentary

It took ten years of persuading, digging, searching and begging. But finally, the Beaver Hall Group is getting its due. Explosions of colour, astonishing portraits and a modernist take on the 1920's, set this group of artists on a dramatically different course from the Group of Seven. Half of them were women.
Prudence Heward (1896-1947); At The Theatre, 1928; Oil on canvas
Listen27:18

It took ten years of persuading, digging, searching and begging. But finally, the Beaver Hall Group is getting its due. Explosions of colour, astonishing portraits and a modernist take on the 1920's, set this group of artists on a dramatically different course from the Group of Seven. Not only that, half of them were women.

Click on the 'i' to see the paintings' caption. 

A few in the Beaver Hall Group became well known in the art world. But the group, and so many of its artists, disappeared from the public sphere. Two curators, Jacques Des Rochers and Brian Foss, decided it was time that all of these painters - men and women - got their due. They spent almost ten years making it happen.

Co-curators Jacques Des Rochers and Brian Foss. Art historian, Esther Trepanier.
Their hugely successful exhibition at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts closed earlier this year; it is now at the Art Gallery of Windsor, and will soon travel to Calgary's Glenbow Museum. 

Alisa Siegel's documentary is called "Who Gets to be Remembered." It was first broadcast in February, 2016. 

Jacques Des Rochers - Curator of the exhibition, 1920's Modernism in Montreal: The Beaver Hall Group. 1:13
Brian Foss - Professor of Art History Director of the School for Studies in Art and Culture Carleton University, Ottawa 4:44
Brian Foss - Professor of Art History Director of the School for Studies in Art and Culture Carleton University, Ottawa 2:54

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