Sunday July 03, 2016

Getting it wrong; Steve Martin, art curator; In praise of the donkey; The biological clock; Canadian diplomacy

Listen to Full Episode 1:42:58

If we're so full of information, why do we get everything wrong? - Michael's essay: Here's an excerpt: "We are the most informationized generation in human history. We have think tanks and experts and pundits and consultants and above all the internet."

How Steve Martin fell in love with the paintings of Canadian artist Lawren Harris: The talented Mr. Martin is much more than a brilliant comedian — he's an actor, producer, novelist, essayist, banjo-player...and art connoisseur. He has co-curated a new exhibition of the work of Group of Seven artist  Lawren Harris, which opens at the Art Gallery of Ontario on Canada Day. He takes Michael Enright on a tour of his favourite paintings.

In praise of the humble (and unfairly maligned!) donkey: Alisa Siegel visits Karen Pollard's farm in Erin, Ontario, where the donkey is king. Or queen, to be accurate.

Science, sexism and the ticking of the biological clock: Women are urged to put aside their careers and start having babies before it's too late. But why is the pressure to have children focused solely on women?  Moira Weigel says the biological clock was invented in the late '70s by a combination of science and sexism. Weigel is the author of the much-praised new book,  Labor of Love: The Invention of Dating. 

Rebuilding Canada's foreign service after its "decade of darkness": Shortly after last October's election, Justin Trudeau sent a message to our allies around the world. "Canada is back", was a signal that we would once again embrace our traditional role as a peacekeeper and leader in matters of conscience. Former diplomat Daryl Copeland says this is in marked contrast to the foreign policy of the Harper government, which, he says, inflicted great harm on Canada's global influence.

Music this week by:  Aaron Copland, Duke Ellington, Allison Crowe, Papa Haydn, Dinah Washington and The Gene Di Novi Trio.

stories from this episode

  • 91298885

    If we're so full of information, why do we get everything wrong? - Michael's essay

    The problem is we look for assurances and answers where there are none. We seek salvation in speculation. And the more weighed down with expertise the expert, the more we think we are learning; the closer we are to reality, to empirically proven truth. Which is all wrong.

    Listen 4:44
  • Steve Martin and Michael Enright

    Why Steve Martin fell in love with Group of Seven painter Lawren Harris

    The talented Steve Martin is much more than a brilliant comedian — he's an actor, producer, novelist, essayist, banjo-player...and art connoisseur. He has curated a new exhibition of the paintings of Group of Seven artist Lawren Harris at the Art Gallery of Ontario. He takes Michael Enright on a tour of his favourite paintings, to explain what he loves about them, and why it's OK that they all look the same.

    Listen 25:33
  • Karen Pollard and Echo

    In praise of the humble (and unfairly maligned!) donkey

    The fictional world has not been particularly kind to the donkey. The real world is no walk in the pasture either. Unless, of course, you are a donkey who lives on Karen Pollard's farm in Erin, Ontario.

    Listen 11:51
  • Moira Weigel Labor of Love

    Science, sexism and the ticking of the 'biological clock'

    Women are urged to put aside their careers and start having babies before it's too late. But since men's fertility declines with age too, why is the pressure to have children focused solely on women? Moira Weigel, the author of the much-praised new book Labor of Love: The Invention of Dating, talks to Michael Enright about the strange history of the biological clock and how sexism colours our understanding of science.

    Listen 23:27
  • 89696730

    Rebuilding Canada's foreign service after its "decade of darkness"

    Shortly after last October's election, Justin Trudeau sent a message to our allies around the world. "Canada is back," he said. It was a signal that we would once again embrace our traditional role as a peacekeeper, and as a leader in matters of conscience. Former diplomat Daryl Copeland says this is in marked contrast to the foreign policy of the Harper government.

    Listen 23:34
  • 52225197CF016_Pensioners_In

    We're looking for your stories about "grey divorce"

    Producer Ashley Walters is working on a radio documentary about "grey divorce," and would like to connect with men and women who would be willing to share their stories. The specs? Over 60, and at least thirty years of marriage.

    Listen 1:40