Dylan goes electric; Internet double; Medical marijuana; Cricket cuisine

Dylan goes electric: Fifty years ago this month, Bob Dylan took the stage at the legendary Newport Folk Festival and changed the face of pop music forever. Musicologist Rob Bowman talks about the significance of that iconic Dylan performance and how it changed the trajectory of pop music. Internet double: Reprise of a documentary by CBC Halifax journalist Molly Segal, who confronts the namesake who haunts her online. How medical is medical marijuana? Re-broadcast and update of our special report on the legal and health issues surrounding marijuana. Cricket cuisine: Producer Frank Faulk pays a visit to a farm that's banking on insects as the future of food production for his documentary "Jiminy Cricket! I'm Hungry!"
Listen to the full episode1:32:00

Dylan goes electric: (00:00:10) 

Fifty years ago this month, Bob Dylan made his third appearance at the legendary Newport Folk Festival with close to 100,000 die-hard folk fans there to cheer him on. But when the 24-year-old singer took to the stage and ripped into an electric version of "Maggie's Farm", well according to legend he was booed and called a sellout. Musicologist Rob Bowman talks about the significance of that iconic Dylan performance back in 1965 and how it changed the trajectory of pop music. 

Internet double: (00:36:19) Just what happened when Molly met Molly? Reprise of a documentary by CBC Halifax journalist Molly Segal, who confronts the namesake who haunts her online.

How medical is medical marijuana?: (00:44:30) We will re-broadcast and update a special report on the legal and health issues surrounding the drug, including conversations with Vancouver city councillor Kerry Jang; and Dr. Mark Ware, Executive Director of the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids. He is a world-renowned leader in cannabis research.

Cricket cuisine: (01:17:47) Producer Frank Faulk takes one for The Sunday Edition team and gets a taste of cricket. Not the sport, the bug. He pays a visit to a farm that's banking on insects as the future of food production for his documentary "Jiminy Cricket! I'm Hungry!" 

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