Sunday July 12, 2015

Dylan goes electric; Internet double; Medical marijuana; Cricket cuisine

Listen to Full Episode 1:32:00

Dylan goes electric: (00:00:10) 

Fifty years ago this month, Bob Dylan made his third appearance at the legendary Newport Folk Festival with close to 100,000 die-hard folk fans there to cheer him on. But when the 24-year-old singer took to the stage and ripped into an electric version of "Maggie's Farm", well according to legend he was booed and called a sellout. Musicologist Rob Bowman talks about the significance of that iconic Dylan performance back in 1965 and how it changed the trajectory of pop music. 

Internet double: (00:36:19) Just what happened when Molly met Molly? Reprise of a documentary by CBC Halifax journalist Molly Segal, who confronts the namesake who haunts her online.

How medical is medical marijuana?: (00:44:30) We will re-broadcast and update a special report on the legal and health issues surrounding the drug, including conversations with Vancouver city councillor Kerry Jang; and Dr. Mark Ware, Executive Director of the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids. He is a world-renowned leader in cannabis research.

Cricket cuisine: (01:17:47) Producer Frank Faulk takes one for The Sunday Edition team and gets a taste of cricket. Not the sport, the bug. He pays a visit to a farm that's banking on insects as the future of food production for his documentary "Jiminy Cricket! I'm Hungry!" 

stories from this episode

  • Bob Dylan goes electric at the Newport Folk Festival

    Dylan goes electric

    Dylan goes electric: Fifty years ago this month, Bob Dylan took the stage at the legendary Newport Folk Festival and changed the face of pop music forever. Musicologist Rob Bowman talks about the significance of that iconic Dylan performance and how it changed the trajectory of pop music.

    Listen 36:03
  • CBC producer Molly Segal

    Molly Segal meets her online namesake

    Admit it - you've looked too. Snooped and surfed the internet for the skinny on your namesake, that other person with a totally different life who shares your name. Molly Segal went a step further.

    Listen 8:00
  • Medical marijuana

    How medical is medical marijuana?

    The government has authorized more than 50 thousand Canadians to use medical marijuana; that number is expected to grow ten-fold over the next decade. But professional medical organizations continue to advocate against medical marijuana, saying not enough is known about its effectiveness or potency to write an accurate prescription.

    Watch $media.content.runtime
  • cricket

    Cricket farmer says his crop could help solve world food shortage

    Producer Frank Faulk pays a visit to a farm that's banking on insects as the future of food production for his documentary "Jiminy Cricket! I'm Hungry!"

    Listen 13:44