THE HOUSE

Inside Canada's efforts to inject climate change into NAFTA 2.0

Canada is looking to places beyond the White House to support a chapter on the environment in an updated version of the North American Free Trade Agreement, despite U.S. President Donald Trump's indifference, at one point even denial, towards climate change.
Listen8:59

Canada is looking to places beyond the White House to support a chapter on the environment in an updated version of the North American Free Trade Agreement, despite U.S. President Donald Trump's indifference, at one point even denial, towards climate change.

Ahead of the third round of negotiations in Ottawa this weekend and early next week, Canada's Environment Minister met with her NAFTA advisory council on the environment on Friday.

Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna speaks with the media at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City, Wednesday September 20, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

The 10-member council includes Canadians with politics, law, and Indigenous backgrounds to advise McKenna environmental issues as Canada looks to strengthen environmental protections in a new NAFTA.

Climate change was been seen as a potential stumbling block in the negotiations, as Trump has previously called global warming a "hoax," withdrew the U.S. from the Paris Climate Accord and promises to rebuild America's coal industry.

"There are many different kinds of folks out there in the United States and so, yes, while federally they may be taking a different approach certainly we've seen at the state level lots of good action," McKenna told host Chris Hall.

"Canada has to make decisions for itself... We need to make sure we're regulating in our own national interest."

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna joins us ahead of the third round of NAFTA talks to discuss her efforts to include climate change language in the new deal. 8:59