Can an international court stamp out government corruption?

Government corruption costs the global economy a staggering $1 trillion. Given the number of corrupt governments stealing from their own people, should there be an international anti-corruption court?
British Prime Minister Cameron, left, shakes hands with Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani after a session at the Anti-Corruption Summit, May 12, 2016. David Cameron gathered leaders, civil-society groups and representatives of banks and financial institutions with the goal of producing a strong global declaration against financial wrongdoing. (Paul Hackett/Pool via AP)
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The World Bank estimates government corruption costs the global economy a staggering $1 trillion annually. 

Brazil's corruption scandal involving a massive kickback scheme with the state-run oil company Petrobras is believed to be the largest corruption scandal ever in a democratic country.
 
But it's not just Brazil in the limelight for corruption — world leaders and bureaucrats holding office in other countries continue to empty public coffers with seeming impunity.

On May 12, British Prime Minister David Cameron hosted an anti-corruption summit in London to openly address ongoing international government corruption in an attempt to stamp out what Cameron called the global "cancer" of corruption.

The Current explores what role such a court could play in battling out corruption.

Brazil is reeling from a $5.3 billion corruption scandal involving Petrobras - the largest corruption scandal ever in a democratic country. (Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

Guests in this segment:

This segment was produced by The Current's John Chipman and Sujata Berry.