Friday June 24, 2016

Sleep crucial to hospitalized children's healing — and they're not getting enough

Some hospitals are starting to place greater emphasis on sleep as an essential healing strategy for kids.

Some hospitals are starting to place greater emphasis on sleep as an essential healing strategy for kids. (Sakena/Flickr cc)

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While a hospitalized child may get round-the-clock medical care, it turns out that child patients may be missing one of the most important components to their healing and recovery: sleep.

New research reveals a direct link between sleep and health, prompting hospitals to pay more attention to pediatric patients' ability to get a good night's sleep. 

The Current discusses the role of rest in a child's health and the strategies hospitals are taking to facilitate sleep.  

'The environment that's optimal at home is optimal in the hospital setting as well.' - Dr. Kudchadkar, on a shift to prioritize natural rhythms in care facilities 

  • Sapna Kudchadkar, assistant professor of anesthesiology, critical care and pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore
  • Robyn Stremler, assistant professor at the University of Toronto and an adjunct scientist at The Hospital for Sick Children
  • Karen Haas spent hundreds of sleepless nights at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with her son, Tobin


This segment was produced by The Current's Pacinthe Mattar and Willow Smith