Friday January 06, 2017

Conservatives clash in fight to re-define party after Stephen Harper

Andrew Scheer, Kellie Leitch and Brad Trost, left to right, participate in the Conservative leadership candidates' bilingual debate in Moncton, N.B. on Dec.6, 2016. Conservatives vote for a new party leader on May 27, 2017.

Andrew Scheer, Kellie Leitch and Brad Trost, left to right, participate in the Conservative leadership candidates' bilingual debate in Moncton, N.B. on Dec.6, 2016. Conservatives vote for a new party leader on May 27, 2017. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

Listen 19:56

Read story transcript

The race for the Conservative Party's leadership is crowded, competitive and crucial in setting the brand of the party in the post-Harper era. 

'Now that Harper's gone, the driving, centralized intelligence of the party is gone. The danger is that it could break up into component parts, and I think that's what we're kind of seeing happen.' - Gerry Nicholls, political strategist

After almost a decade in power under Harper, the Tories are back in opposition and find themselves facing a popular prime minister.

So, who is best to take up the mantle and take on Justin Trudeau? How should the party position itself in this post-Harper era? 

A panel of conservative strategists share their thoughts with The Current.  

  • Ginny Movat, a senior consultant with Crestview Strategy
  • Gerry Nicholls, a communications consultant and strategist
  • Tim Powers, with Summa Strategies

Listen to the full conversation at the top of this post. 

This segment was produced by The Current's Sarah Grant and Network Producer Michael O'Halloran.