The Current

How burglars use city architecture as opportunity for heists and escapes

Every city that boasts beautiful buildings and breathtaking skyscapes is also a tease for burglars who love a puzzle. Where we see soaring architecture, they see nefarious opportunity. The Current takes a guided tour of a burglar's city.
A noted architecture writer, Geoff Manaugh, looks at cities and buildings through the eyes of a burglar. In this photo, Manaugh flies over Los Angeles with the LAPD Air Support Division. (Instagrams by BLDGBLOG)
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Burglars see opportunity when the rest of us just see architecture, says Geoff Managuh, author of A Burglar's Guide to the City. ( Instagram by BLDGBLOG)

Every city that boasts beautiful buildings and breathtaking skyscapes is also a tease for burglars who love a puzzle. Where we see soaring architecture, they see nefarious opportunity.

Burglars tend to see the world — and its buildings — with an eye for escape routes. Even the design of a city itself can play a factor into how to get away with a heist.

That's the idea behind a new book by architecture writer Geoff Manaugh. He runs the website, bldgblog, and his book is called, A Burglar's Guide to the City.

In this aerial view  of a Los Angeles freeway and neighbourhood, looking from above provides insights into how the neighborhoods are connected, where criminals might attempt to hide—or flee—from police, according to Geoff Manaugh.

Freeways and escape routes through the eyes of a burglar. ( Instagrams by BLDGBLOG)

This segment was produced by The Current's Liz Hoath.