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June 18, 2018 episode transcript

Full text transcript for June 18th episode

Finding Adler: The music and mystery of the Jewish refugee who shaped the lives of a Chinese family

During the Second World War, a Jewish refugee escaped the Nazis and fled to Shanghai. There, he taught music to a group of orphans, but abruptly disappeared in 1947. The Chinese-Canadian son of one of those orphans, Fang Sheng, set out to solve the mystery of what happened to him.

The Current for June 18, 2018

From a call on the government to admit more LGBTQ refugees into Canada; to debating the legacy of Thomas Jefferson with the exhibit of of Sally Hemings' bedroom; to how an Austrian Jew taught orphans to become members of China's symphony orchestra ... This is The Current.

What Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings had was not a 'love affair,' new Monticello exhibit reveals

An exhibit at the Monticello plantation is being applauded by many descendants for acknowledging the life of Sally Hemings, and for sharing the truth behind her relationship with Thomas Jefferson.

Helping refugees becoming a 'popularity contest,' says advocate

Conservative MP Michelle Rempel has called for the government to let in more LGBTQ refugees and to track the numbers, but some advocates worry about politicizing the refugee system and warn against prioritizing any particular group over others.

Lea Garofalo was killed by her Mafia family. Now she's the face of anti-mob protests

A new book chronicles the women trying to take down the Mafia.

Finding Adler: The music and mystery of the Jewish refugee who shaped the lives of a Chinese family

During the Second World War, a Jewish refugee escaped the Nazis and fled to Shanghai. There, he taught music to a group of orphans, but abruptly disappeared in 1947. The Chinese-Canadian son of one of those orphans, Fang Sheng, grew up hearing stories of this man, and set out to solve the mystery of what happened to him.

June 15, 2018

Full-text transcript

Should Canada scrap immigration deal with the U.S. over safety concerns?

While centres for unaccompanied migrant minors are raising concerns about child welfare, some experts say it's reason enough to scrap Canada’s refugee agreement with the U.S.

The Current for June 15, 2018

From the inquiry into Elizabeth Wettlaufer murders raising questions about how long-term care homes are run; to the story of women who took on a powerful mafia; to a 'zero tolerance' migrant policy in the U.S. separating children from their parents ... This is The Current with Ioanna Roumeliotis.

Lea Garofalo was killed by her Mafia family. Now she's the face of anti-mob protests

Alex Perry's new book looks at the women who are fighting to bring down the Mafia, and inspiring people across Italy to say enough is enough.

Lea Garofalo was killed by her Mafia family. Now she's the face of anti-mob protests

Alex Perry's new book looks at the women who are fighting to bring down the Mafia, and inspiring people across Italy to say enough is enough.

Daughter of Wettlaufer's last victim unconvinced inquiry will result in changes to system

Susan Horvath has lost faith in long-term care after her father was murdered by Elizabeth Wettlaufer. She's not confident an inquiry looking into how her crimes went undetected for a decade will result in any improvements.

Daughter of Wettlaufer's last victim unconvinced inquiry will result in changes to system

Susan Horvath has lost faith in long-term care after her father was murdered by Elizabeth Wettlaufer. She's not confident an inquiry looking into how her crimes went undetected for a decade will result in any improvements.

From piety to prosperity: What obituary trends reveal about society's shifting values

What does the state of today’s obituaries say about life as we know it?

'Ear-witness testimony': Detainees' memories used to map out notorious Syrian prison

A research group called Forensic Architecture has recreated a prison in Syria, a place no outsider has had access to since the beginning of the war. Former detainee testimony is used to construct an interactive model

How reporter Seymour Hersh uncovered a massacre, and changed the Vietnam War dialogue

American soldiers conduct an investigation in My Lai, January 1970. Seymour Hersh broke the story of the massacre that occurred there in 1968. He details that story in his new book, Reporter: A Memoir.

Why fans still flock to the World Cup despite politics and controversy

Despite political controversy in this year's World Cup in Russia, soccer fans still get excited for the tournament and argue the game has a powerful connection to unite the world.

Does Canada need a national cycling strategy?

As cycle advocates lobby for more bike lanes to make travel safer, critics argue Canada needs a more strategic solution than simply building more infrastructure.

Why fans still flock to the World Cup despite politics and controversy

Despite political controversy in this year's World Cup in Russia, soccer fans are still get excited for the tournament and argue the game has a powerful connection to unite the world.

Thursday June 14, 2018 Full Episode Transcript

Full text transcript for June 14th episode.

Does Canada need a national cycling strategy?

As cycle advocates lobby for more bike lanes to make travel safer, critics argue Canada needs a more strategic solution than simply building more infrastructure.

The Current for June 14, 2018

From cycling advocates calling for a Canadian strategy to keep people safe; to whether Russia's controversies will affect the FIFA World Cup; to investigative journalist Seymour Hersh on reporting some of the biggest stories of the past 50 years ... This is The Current.

How reporter Seymour Hersh uncovered a massacre, and changed the Vietnam War dialogue

Seymour Hersh brings great insight into investigative journalism — past and present — because he has broken some of the most important and history-making stories of the last fifty years.

How reporter Seymour Hersh uncovered a massacre, and changed the Vietnam War dialogue

Seymour Hersh brings great insight into investigative journalism — past and present — because he has broken some of the most important and history-making stories of the last fifty years.