Latest

These designers think everyone should wear jumpsuits — so they've made one in 248 sizes

The Rational Dress Society proposes that we clear out our wardrobes and wear jumpsuits 24/7. It's not just a fashion statement, it's a path to unity and equality, they say.

The Current for August 14, 2018

From signs of deeper economic and political problems in Turkey as the currency crisis escalates; to the hidden history of the Nazi connection to autism's most famous researcher; to freedom from fashion: making the leap into jumpsuits ... This is The Current with guest host, Laura Lynch.

Charlottesville resistance 'knocked the alt-right back on its heels,' says prof

Charlottesville is still grappling with the trauma and fallout from last year's Unite the Right rally, but one professor says the resistance to the white supremacists has been effective.

Canadian 'Raccoon Whisperer' draws international admirers

Jim Blackwood has been feeding raccoons from his deck for two decades. Videos showcasing his raccoon family have been met with such enthusiasm online that some international fans are travelling to see the interactions first-hand.

How Judy Rebick's 11 personalities helped her cope with the abuse she suffered as a child

Feminist Judy Rebick reveals she lived with multiple personalities — and that it made her a stronger activist.

The Current for August 13, 2018

From a community still reckoning with the aftermath of the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville; to the love of raccoons and tourists traveling to rural Nova Scotia to meet the Raccoon Whisperer and his furry friends; to the inner lives of famed Canadian feminist Judy Rebick ... This is The Current with guest host, Laura Lynch.

Children at daycare shielded in windowless room amid fatal Fredericton shooting

A shooting in Fredericton, N.B., has left at least four people dead. We speak to locals about how they coped during those fearful hours.

How 'counter-monuments' can solve the debate over controversial historical statues

Amidst the disagreement over what to do about John A. Macdonald statues in Canada, one expert points to "counter-monuments" as a way to add historical context without removing what already exists.

Telling their stories on canvas: Syrian refugees take art classes to overcome trauma

An art project in Toronto aimed to help Syrian refugees confront their trauma, by letting them tell their stories on canvas.

The Current for August 10, 2018

From a Fredericton shooting that has left four dead; to the argument for "counter-monuments" in the debate over removing a John A Macdonald statue in Victoria; to how art has helped Syrian newcomers express their trauma; to confronting our adultitarian system by giving kids permission to cut hair ... This is The Current with guest host, Laura Lynch.

Activist says Saudi police threatened his family after he tweeted about diplomatic row with Canada

A Saudi Arabian man living in Canada says he won't stop speaking out about the diplomatic row between the two countries, even though Saudi police have allegedly threatened his family.

Would you let a 10-year-old cut your hair? Artist argues we should give kids more control

Theatre artist Darren O'Donnell says it's time to break down our 'adultitarian' society and take children and their abilities more seriously.

Why the origins of deep brain stimulation fell into obscurity

In 1950, Dr. Robert Heath invented a technique to change the human brain using deep brain stimulation. Now it's used to treat a range of illnesses. Author Lone Frank shares the forgotten story behind Heath's controversial work in her book.

Hitler in L.A.: How private Jewish spies foiled a Nazi Hollywood takeover

Murder plots, secret spies, and big sums of money. In his new book, professor Steven J. Ross tells the unbelievable story of how Nazis intent on affecting America culture almost co-opted Hollywood.

The Current for August 9, 2018

From how the dispute with Saudi Arabia will impact health care as Saudi medical students are ordered to leave Canada; to the neuroscientist behind deep brain stimulation; to the story of how private Jewish spies foiled a Nazi Hollywood ... This is The Current with guest host, Laura Lynch.

Banning Alex Jones, Infowars could 'backfire,' tech journalist says

The rules invoked to ban Alex Jones and Infowars from online platforms have existed for years, says a technology writer. By not addressing the issue until now, companies have allowed his popularity and influence to grow.

Recycling injectors could help solve EpiPen shortage: researcher

Dr. Jackie Duffin offers a practical solution to curtail the ongoing EpiPen shortage — reusing expired injectors. Having researched the drug shortage, she's now calling on the government to do more to protect Canadians.

The race for the perfect red: Why we still haven't cracked the colour of love, excitement and blood

In the history of producing colour pigments, our efforts to make the perfect red have often resulted in shades not quite bright enough or prone to fading. But after scientists accidentally discovered a new shade of blue, the race is on to create the right red.

The Current for August 8, 2018

From critics arguing it's too late to curb broadcaster Alex Jones' influence by banning him on social media; to an EpiPen shortage across Canada that has carriers worried; to why artists and scientists are struggling to produce the perfect shade of red ... This is The Current with guest host Laura Lynch.

Was Canada's criticism of Saudi Arabia a diplomatic faux pas?

Saudi Arabia announced Sunday it would cease new trade deals with Canada in reaction to Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland's tweets calling for the 'immediate release' of detained Saudi activists.

Ontario artist all smiles after anonymous donors pay for her desperately needed dental care

Three Good Samaritans have covered the costs of dental work which Brandi Jasmine couldn't afford, opening a world of opportunity for a woman who had been suffering from chronic pain and depression.
The Current

Dave Stock beat cancer twice but faces a $10,000 dental bill

"People don't think cancer will lead to dental issues. Once you're done with the cancer, there's nothing to cover what happens next."

From tooth pullers to dentists: Dental care's 'really painful' history

When it comes to the history of dentistry, "it's really, really painful."

Overall health includes oral health: Should dental be part of universal health care

Dentists are divided on whether universalizing dental care is the way to fix problems of inadequate and inequitable coverage.

The Current for August 7, 2018

From how Saudi Arabia's decision to suspend trade with Canada is a message to the Western world, to a look at the state of dental care and access across Canada ... This is the Current with guest host Laura Lynch.