'Principled confrontation': the Uber playbook

Chances are you've heard a story about Uber and your local city council sometime in the past year. The company has a strategy for how it breaks into new markets, called "principled confrontation." Paul Haavardsrud, of the CBC Business desk, walks us through that strategy.
Uber headquarters in San Francisco. (Eric Risberg/The Associated Press)
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Chances are you've heard a story about Uber and your local city council sometime in the past year. Uber comes into town, lobbies mayors and councils, and sometimes starts operating before the city has granted permission.

It's all part of the Uber strategy, called "principled confrontation." Paul Haavardsrud, of the CBC business desk, has been studying the strategy, and joined us to explain.  

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