An oral history of the 'B' Girls, Toronto's first all-female punk band

At the height of The ‘B’ Girls' success, the band fell apart and the music they recorded was never released. Now, 40 years later, they're back together touring.
The 'B' Girls with Debbie Harry in Los Angeles, 1979. (Theresa Kereakes )
Listen13:55

In the 1980s, Cynthia Ross felt like there was no place to go but up. Her Toronto-born all-female punk band The 'B' Girls were booking regular gigs at the legendary CBGB's in New York City, they wrapped up a North American tour with The Clash, and their songs were being produced by artists like Debbie Harry. But at the height of all this success, the band fell apart and the music they recorded for their debut album was never released. Now, 40 years later, they're back together touring and their debut album has finally been released. We tap bassist Cynthia Ross to give us the oral history of The 'B' Girls — the greatest all girl Canadian punk band that never was.

You can buy The 'B' Girls first full-length Vinyl release, BAD not EVIL online at bompstore.com.

— Produced by Vanessa Nigro

At the height of The ‘B’ Girls' success, the band fell apart and the music they recorded was never released. Now, 40 years later, they're back together touring. 13:55

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