Q

Brown Girl Begins brings a post-apocalyptic Toronto to life

Director Sharon Lewis talks about Black Futures Month and why increasing the representation of young black women on the big screen is important.
Director Sharon Lewis and Tom Power in the q studio in Toronto, Ont. (Vivian Rashotte/CBC)
Listen13:03

In the wake of Black Panther's theatrical release, Canadian director Sharon Lewis debuts the first Canadian-Caribbean Afrofuturist film Brown Girl Begins. Based on a prequel of Nalo Hopkinson's novel Brown Girl in the Ring, Lewis imagines a post-apocalyptic Toronto in which a young priestess must resurrect ancient Caribbean spirits to save her people.

Today, Lewis joins Tom Power live in the q studio to talk about Black Futures Month and why increasing the representation of young black women on the big screen is important.

Produced by Chanel Klein

Director Sharon Lewis talks about Black Futures Month and why increasing the representation of young black women on the big screen is important. 13:03

The Sharon Lewis film, Brown Girl Begins, adapts the Nalo Hopkinson novel for the screen. (Courtesy of Brown Girl Begins/Grand Central Publishing)

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