Enter Margaret Atwood's believable dystopia

Canadian literary icon Margaret Atwood is back with The Heart Goes Last, her alarming new work of speculative fiction.
Canadian literary icon Margaret Atwood joins Shad to discuss The Heart Goes Last, her new dystopian novel about the bleak future that awaits us. Although her speculative tale is rife with sex robots and voluntary prisons, all is not lost. In a wide-ranging interview, the writer reflects on authoritarianism, human nature, and the durability of hope in the darkest of circumstances. 34:44

When it comes to speculative fiction, Margaret Atwood is unnervingly good. 

The Canadian literary icon joins Shad to discuss The Heart Goes Last, her latest dystopian novel about the bleak future — informed, as always, by the bleak present.

This time, Atwood's desperate protagonists sign up for a social experiment that puts them behind bars. In a world of for-profit prisons, freedom is a tradable commodity and conformity is a survival strategy.

(And, yes, there are sex robots involved.) 

Canadian literary icon Margaret Atwood is back with The Heart Goes Last, her alarming new work of speculative fiction. (Fabiola Carletti/CBC)
Sex robots, poverty and voluntary prison. Enter Margaret Atwood's believable dystopia. (Ben Shannon, CBC/jmiller291, Flickr CC)

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