Zackary Drucker on 1950s trans safehouse Casa Susanna

Artist Zackary Drucker discusses the history of the trans safe haven of the 1950s, Casa Susanna, and the representation of transfolk in media.
In the 1950s and early 1960s, Casa Susanna was a safe space for men who wanted to wear white gloves, cocktail dresses and stiff wigs — among friends. Artist and "Transparent" producer Zackary Drucker joins Shad to discuss the safehouse ahead of its time, and how her generation of transfolk are claiming previously unthinkable identities. 9:21
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In the 1950s and early 1960s, Casa Susanna was a safe space for men who wanted to wear white gloves, cocktail dresses and stiff wigs — among friends.   

The secretive compound in New York was a safe haven for feminine identities. Rare photographs of this gender-bending group now form part of the Art Gallery of Ontario's Outsiders exhibition.

Artist and Transparent producer Zackary Drucker joins Shad to discuss the safehouse ahead of its time, and how her generation of transfolk are claiming previously unthinkable identities.

WEB EXTRA | A selection of the images featured in the Casa Susanna exhibition at the AGO

Zackary Drucker is a performance artist and TV producer/consultant on Amazon's hit show 'Transparent' ( Amazon Studios)
Susanna at Casa Susanna, 1964-1969 (Andrea Susan/AGO)
Susanna in a pink, green and yellow dress, sitting with friends, 1960s (Unknown American/AGO)
Susanna and a friend in the kitchen, 1955- 1963 (Unknown American/AGO)
Susanna and three friends outside, 1964-1969 (Unknown American/AGO)

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