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Meet Margaret Atwood's fledgling superhero Angel Catbird

Canadian author Margaret Atwood has created a superhero that flies, eats rats —​ and wants you to protect the little animals.
It's not a bird, it's not a plane — it's Margaret Atwood's first graphic novel superhero: Angel Catbird! The Canadian author and the book's illustrator Johnnie Christmas join guest host Candy Palmater to discuss the complex new creature and the environmental crisis that motivates story. 21:45
Listen16:32

It's not a bird, it's not a plane — it's Margaret Atwood's first graphic novel superhero: Angel Catbird!

The Canadian author has joined forces with illustrator Johnnie Christmas to tell the story of a genetic engineer who is accidentally spliced with a cat and an owl, creating a complex new creature with both predatory and protective instincts.

The pair join guest host Candy Palmater to discuss the environmental crisis that motivates the story, the author's longtime love of comic books, and what it would take to get Atwood in an Angel Catbird suit. 

Canadian author Margaret Atwood has created a superhero that flies, eats rats —​ and wants you to protect the little animals. (Dark Horse Comics)
Margaret Atwood’s highly-anticipated new graphic novel, 'Angel Catbird' features a hero that understands both predator and prey. (Johnnie Christmas/Tamra Bonvillain)

WEB EXTRA | Following last week's pretape, Candy asked Atwood and Christmas to stick around for a real-time drawing challenge — and they accepted! Watch the replay to find out what Atwood looks like in cartoon form, and whether the great Canadian author herself has a hidden talent.

And here are the results of our spontaneous drawing challenge!

Margaret Atwood herself has some cartooning chops. Here's her version of Angel Catbird, featuring an onlooker who really resembles a certain guest host ... (Margaret Atwood)
Johnnie Christmas draws Margaret Atwood in feline form. (Johnnie Christmas)

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