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Buffy Sainte-Marie presents 4 songs she holds dear

As part of our ongoing q playlist series, Buffy Sainte-Marie walks Shad through four powerful tracks with great personal significance.
As part of our ongoing q playlist series, Buffy Sainte-Marie walks Shad through four powerful tracks with great personal significance. The legendary artist, educator and activist ​last joined us to discuss her Polaris-winning album, Power in the Blood, but today she turns the focus on the powerful work of other artists. 31:17
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As part of our ongoing q playlist series, Buffy Sainte-Marie walks Shad through four powerful tracks with great personal significance. 

The legendary artist, educator and activist ​last joined us to discuss her Polaris-winning album, Power in the Blood, but today she turns her focus on the powerful work of other artists. She also shares how music gripped her at a young age, and why she compares artists to sacred clowns.

The ever-vibrant Buffy Sainte-Marie returns to studio q with a special National Aboriginal Day playlist. (Fabiola Carletti/CBC)

Buffy's four picks

1) Culture Bleeding, Xavier Rudd. Sainte-Marie says Rudd is a brilliant performer, and a pretty one to boot. Her first selection is just one she enjoys and thinks everyone should hear. 

​2) Overture to Tannhauser, Wagner. Sainte-Marie says she never had to "learn" this song as a child. She took it in and repeated it, despite her musical dyslexia. "I learn through my ears instead of my eyes."

3) Masters of War, Bob Dylan. Sainte-Marie says Dylan was a great, great lyricist. "He just nailed it. He said things to the establishment that we students needed to hear." 

4) Rip It In, Northern Cree. Sainte-Marie describes Northern Cree as everybody's favourite drum group. 
Legendary artist, educator and activist Buffy Sainte-Marie reflects on her memories of Muhammad Ali, shortly after his death. 3:33
As part of our ongoing q playlist series, Buffy Sainte-Marie walks Shad through four powerful tracks with great personal significance. (Fabiola Carletti/CBC)

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