Is Full House "everything wrong with America?" This guy watched every episode to find out

Piya Chattopadhyay talks to Ryan Alexander-Tanner about Full House and what it says about why this "awful" show appealed to so many viewers in its heyday.
Andrea Barber, Jodie Sweetin, and Candace Cameron-Bure are shown during a scene from Fuller House. The entire 13-episode season hits Netflix on Friday. (Michael Yarish/Netflix)

Everywhere you look. It's the theme song of the 1980s and 90s sitcom Full House. And it's been freshly remade by Carly Rae Jepsen for the show's Netflix resurrection.

The reboot is called Fuller House, and it marks the return of pop culture names like Uncle Jesse and Kimmy Gibler as well as the entire Tanner clan, including original series lead Bob Saget.

It's like a canker sore you have on the inside of your mouth that you keep chewing on.- Ryan Alexander-Tanner on Full House

It's just the latest in a rash of nostalgic TV necromancy, from The X-Files to Jem and the Holograms to the upcoming new season of Twin Peaks.

Why, three decades after its launch, is Full House back in 2016?

Ryan Alexander-Tanner (yes, his name really is Tanner) took on a mission to find out. He watched and reviewed every episode of the original series — all 192 episodes — and concluded that the show is "everything that is wrong with America." His blog is called Full House Reviewed.


To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.