Naila Keleta-Mae on the void Prince leaves in popular culture

Theatre and performance professor Naila Keleta-Mae says Prince "queered popular culture" with his gender fluidity.
Naila Keleta-Mae says what sets Prince's music apart is that it's both complex and accessible. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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Theatre and performance professor Naila Keleta-Mae says Prince "queered popular culture" with his gender fluidity.

Keleta-Mae points to Prince's profound physical performances as one of the many ways Prince impacted popular culture.

"I can't help but think of the Super Bowl performance that he did in 2007. When he came out [with] his love symbol, that symbol he'd created — that was referencing both masculinity and femininity," she tells Shad.

To hear the other tributes to Prince, follow the link.

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