Sunday November 19, 2017

Rewriting History

St. Michael's Indian Residential School entrance, with two students on the driveway, in Alert Bay, B.C., is shown in a 1970 handout photo. In February 2015, church leaders, First Nations (including representatives of Assembly of First Nations), politicians and former students attended a healing/cleansing ceremony hosted by the 'Namgis First Nation to mark the demolition of the closed school's building.

St. Michael's Indian Residential School entrance, with two students on the driveway, in Alert Bay, B.C., is shown in a 1970 handout photo. In February 2015, church leaders, First Nations (including representatives of Assembly of First Nations), politicians and former students attended a healing/cleansing ceremony hosted by the 'Namgis First Nation to mark the demolition of the closed school's building. (Library and Archives Canada/Canadian Press)

Listen to Full Episode 54:00

From John A. MacDonald to residential schools, we're at a time of reckoning over what to do with people, objects and facts of history that are at once significant... but also troubled. This week, Piya explores collective and personal takes on the question: How far should we go to rewrite history?

stories from this episode