In the Field - Latest Media

  • Sunday June 21, 2015

    Back to Africa

    Dr. Eilish Cleery once lived in Sierra Leone. Now she returns to help stop the spread of Ebola. Sifiso Ntuli was a student when he escaped apartheid South Africa to find refuge in Canada. He returns to ask 'can my old home be my new home?'

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday June 14, 2015

    The wounded healer

    Father Lucien Larre has received much praise and many awards for his work with troubled and addicted adolescents. But he’s also faced many problems including accusations which put him in serious trouble with the law.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday June 07, 2015

    Objects of meaning, objects of burden

    Stories about stuff! Things that once seemed vitally important but now you’re not sure what to do with. And things that have outlived their original purpose but find new life in a different form.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday May 31, 2015

    Music moves me; or not

    Music moves a mother to search for her long-lost child. Three people are moved to make music their career even though they can't hear the sounds they’re making. PLUS ‘it moves me not’; one person's confession; music is just white noise.

    Listen 24:58
  • Sunday May 24, 2015

    Crossing borders

    Saeed Jama’s deportation from Canada to Somalia involved a kidnapping, a ransom and a gun-toting gang. PLUS “Lost with a trace”; objects left behind by Mexicans trying to cross into America are memorialised in art.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday May 17, 2015

    Prison stories

    How dance is helping convicted criminals find ‘freedom’ behind bars. An ‘inside story’ of solitary confinement. PLUS; “Freddie’s freedom”; on parole and trying to go straight.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday May 10, 2015

    "Clickbait" the world of online news.

    Truncated stories. Endless lists. Is online news the death of serious journalism or its salvation? Ira Basen with “13 Fascinating Things You Probably Didn't Know, About Online News”

    Listen 53:58
  • Monday May 04, 2015

    Places we have known

    Mary McCarthy lived in Cuba for over sixty years. Two men shaped her life; a rich husband who left her his fortune and Fidel Castro who confiscated it.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday April 26, 2015

    Soldiers' stories

    How has the Canadian military handled, or mishandled, the case of a young soldier who committed suicide? PLUS "Voices of war dreams of peace"; the impact of WW1 on a Toronto church.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday April 19, 2015

    Back to Buhari

    Can Nigeria’s new president “escape the old battles”? A 1985 documentary takes us to Nigeria when Buhari was last in power; journalists and historians, school children and teachers, taxi drivers, nurses, nuns and newly weds.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday April 12, 2015

    Brothers and sisters

    Stories about the bonds between siblings. Grown siblings navigate their new-found religious differences. And a boy writes unanswered letters to his missing older brother.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday April 05, 2015

    The kindness of strangers

    The kindness and compassion of strangers both online and off. A community activates to find a stem cell match. A man memorializes bittersweet comments on YouTube videos. Plus: When help isn't helpful.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday March 29, 2015

    Tourists and travelers

    Stories for the traveler, tourist, and tour guide in all of us. An aspiring London guide prepares for a big test, a town in Spain paints itself blue. Plus: A boat that doesn't go anywhere.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday March 22, 2015

    Get outside and play

    Stories about fresh air and exercise. A daring 60-something skeleton rider hits the ice, the legacy of the first Aboriginal Canadian soccer player, and a woman rediscovers the joy of a bicycle after many years.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday March 15, 2015

    Broke and broken

    The science behind "Broken Heart Syndrome," and the bittersweet stories of two elderly couples facing death. And mill town Iroquois Falls ponders the future when their mill is forced to shut down.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday March 01, 2015

    Our bodies, our selves

    Stories about the extraordinary human body. A 90-something track-and-field star. Students who take their high school's sexist dress code into their own hands. Plus: an autobiography through bra size.

    Listen 53:59
  • Sunday March 08, 2015

    Odd couples

    Stories of unexpected pairings and relationships that cross generations, cultures, and even oceans. Professional musicians and a children's choir, young soccer players and old retirees, and more.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday February 22, 2015

    Time capsules

    Stories about the ways we travel through time. A man learns life lessons from a stranger's clothes. A widow listens to a long-forgotten message from her husband. Plus: a woman revisits her childhood home on Google Streetview.

    Listen 53:59
  • Sunday February 15, 2015

    The power of poetry

    The youngest poet laureate in the country, a grandson who transforms his grandfather's voice into spoken word art, and a young man in prison who turned to poetry to help him through.

    Listen 52:36
  • Sunday February 08, 2015

    Romance life

    The idiosyncratic passions that drive people's lives. A Jamaican chef shares his knowledge, a 78-year-old tap dancer reflects on her feet. Plus: a love letter to the theremin, and the German obsession with audio books.

    Listen 53:59
  • Sunday February 01, 2015

    A helping hand

    Strangers helping strangers. A warm kitchen in Nova Scotia, getting off the street in Vancouver, and baking bannock in Prince George.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday January 25, 2015

    Dogs and cats and rabbits

    Tracking dogs with GPS, nightime 'owl prowls', beneficial beavers and besotted cat owners. Plus how a horse helped a man recover from a serious stroke.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday January 18, 2015

    Gone missing

    Three people search for answers after loved ones disappear. PLUS “Planes of memory”; searching for a WW2 bomber lost in the depths of a Norwegian lake.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday January 11, 2015

    My music my brain

    Can a deaf person can be a musician? Can a singer have brain surgery and remain a singer? PLUS; beating autism with the help of a drum kit.

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday January 04, 2015

    Working the streets

    A day, and night, in the lives of two veteran Halifax pan-handlers. Pioneering women taxi drivers in the streets of Delhi. PLUS "Spare change" - do you give yours to people on the street?

    Listen 53:58
  • Sunday June 22, 2014

    The Big C

    Two inspiring stories about fighting cancer: the amazing Dr. C in St. John's and two big-hearted strangers who stepped into the life of a mother suffering from cancer. Dr. Joshi was on top of the world in the fall of 2013.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday June 15, 2014

    Filipino Canadians

    Stories from the Filipino Canadian communities in Happy Valley/Goose Bay, Newfoundland; Deer Island, New Brunswick and Toronto, Ontario.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday June 08, 2014

    After the Army

    Two documentaries on life after the army. Caroline Hillier reveals the lingering legacy of a US military base in Newfoundland. Molly Segal's An Unlikely Friendship tells the story of a suicidal soldier, a troubling encounter and a surprising alliance.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday May 25, 2014

    Traditional Chinese Medicine

    A look at traditional Chinese medicine in Canadian society.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday May 18, 2014

    A Helping Hand

    Two Stories of helping hands. From Moncton, the many hands who work to keep a young man in his home. From Toronto,the Nanny Angel Network -- a organization of volunteers who offer a helping hand to moms battling cancer.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday May 11, 2014

    Music

    On this episode, stories of music. You'll meet Tom Schilling, Broadway vocal coach now living in Hamilton; a group of German refugees who tell their story through music; and the musical passion of Montreal singer Betty Bonifassi.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday April 27, 2014

    Rwanda

    Today on In the Field, we have four documentaries anchored to the Rwandan tragedy. Some talk of the tragedy. Others of the later efforts to heal. All the stories you will hear today were broadcast on CBC Radio’s Dispatches.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday May 26, 2013

    Rwanda

    Today on In the Field, we have four documentaries anchored to the Rwandan tragedy. Some talk of the tragedy. Others of the later efforts to heal. All the stories you will hear today were broadcast on CBC Radio’s Dispatches.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday May 04, 2014

    Mental Health

    This is Mental Health Week here in Canada. On today’s show, we have three documentaries: all of them which explore different aspects of a subject which is all too often taboo.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday April 20, 2014

    Lions and Whales and Bears, Oh My!

    An animal-centric hour of documentaries featuring a first-hand encounter with a whale, a lion-saving invention and a Northern Ontario owl prowl. And dogs. Lots of dogs.

    Listen 52:53
  • Sunday April 06, 2014

    The other kids

    Straddling two worlds in one classroom. In Slovakia a new law ends separate education for Roma children. In northern Ontario Cree children travel south to sit with non Cree students in a public school in Cochrane.

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday April 13, 2014

    Reports from Uganda

    Dictators who take dictation from God, murderous bullies and military coups, a country recovering from decades of economic mismanagement, rebel activity and civil war. Reports from Uganda, from indepence to the present day.

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday March 30, 2014

    Rewiring our kids

    What is constant texting, multitasking and a life of full time partial attention doing to the physical, emotional and social life of our kids?

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday March 23, 2014

    Afghanistan then and now

    It ended with no marching bands, just a simple ceremony. Was it "twelve years of bravery" or "a quiet end to a long war that solved nothing". Using interviews, news and documentary reports from 2001 to the present day we look back at Canada's gruelling an

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday March 16, 2014

    Journeys of secrets and survival

    The secret of success for Quebec superstar comedienne Lise Dionne is in an old blue trunk. The secret of survival for Lizzy Mahashe is singing. Priya Sankaran travels to India hoping to unlock the secret of her MS.

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday March 09, 2014

    Final wishes, final actions

    "He was loved in so many different ways"; say friends of loner Jude LeBlanc. "Jerome's Bowl"; fulfilling a strange farewell request. "Habtom's path"; a refugee prefers death to being sent back to Africa.

    Listen 52:59
  • Sunday March 02, 2014

    It's about time

    Canada's only watch repair school; "After exile" a time bending encounter on slow train; "Too tall for the shelf" - one man's quest for a grandfather clock.

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday February 16, 2014

    Going back, moving on: Stories from South America

    A son, a father, a military coup in Chile and a "black box" of memory. The Falklands or the Malvinas? Did the war in 1982 change anything?

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday February 09, 2014

    The drama of their lives

    Drama students put feminist icon Doris Anderson centre stage and Toronto street kids find the drama in their own lives.

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday February 02, 2014

    A question of gender

    A gay high school student so popular the bullies leave him alone. Two transgendered University students and the question; which washroom to use?

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday January 26, 2014

    In the battlefield

    "Finding Private Gordon"; a family in Saskatchewan lost a loved one in battle 70 years ago and now, they think, they've found him. "The bomb chaser"; CBC's Art Holmes was the only person brave, or foolish, enough to hold a microphone to the night sky to c

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday January 19, 2014

    The final years

    "The Baba Yaga" house. A group of women in Paris move into a senior's home they run themselves. "Ce N'est pas la Vie en Rose". In a Montreal nursing home some residents have a good sense of humour and a fighting spirit, others live day after day in quiet

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday January 12, 2014

    The mining show

    Fracked oil has led to a boom in the US and Canada but also deadly explosions of rail cars transporting it. A nickel mine in Guatemala is the centre of a violent dispute and rape charges which, in a legal first, will be argued in a Canadian court.

    Listen 52:58
  • Sunday January 05, 2014

    The music show

    Singing for seniors, singing for mental health, yodelling and busking on Toronto's subways; PLUS "The strange case of Benjamin Britten"; looking for traces of the English composer's short stay in a small Quebec town in 1939.

    Listen 52:58
  • Tuesday March 20, 2012

    March 20, 2012 Part 1

    One of the worst disasters in U.S. naval history occurred 70 years ago off the coast of Newfoundland. A destroyer called the Truxton crashed into the cliffs near St. Lawrence during a storm in 1942. Just a couple of kilometres away an even larger ship called the Pollack went aground. The sea took 200 men that night.

    Listen 24:57
  • Tuesday March 20, 2012

    March 20, 2012 Part 2

    Chickens are what brought jobs and security to St Francois, New Brunswick. And chickens are what's tearing the community apart. It's a story of corporate warfare, public-relations blitzes, and dense legal battles. It's also the story of a once happy community where neighbours and families are now at odds with each other.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday March 27, 2012

    March 27, 2012 Part 1

    In part one of this episode. Junior high school boys often get their information about sex and relationships from their friends and increasingly the internet. And some of it is to say the least neither positive or accurate. But a new program in one Calgary junior high is finding out that sex ed can be upfront and healthy. Wise Guyz is run by the Calgary Sexual Health Centre.

    Listen 24:59
  • Tuesday March 27, 2012

    March 27, 2012 Part 2

    In part two of this episode. Nunavut is Canada's youngest territory. Almost half of Nunavut's population is under the age of 20. The average age in all of Canada is almost twice that,thirty seven. So the concerns of young people in Inuit communities are critical. Today young Inuit look as much to the south, as they do to their elders, for ways to live.They have more choices.With choice comes hard decisions, like how to embrace what's new, without discarding what makes Inuit culture so distinct.

    Listen 27:29
  • Tuesday April 03, 2012

    April 3, 2012 Part 1

    In part one of the this episode. A writer deals with his impending death by producing a volume of poems called "Cancer Songs." And the Baymen and the building boom. Construction workers from Newfoundland's outports talk about rebuilding St. John's for their urban cousins, whom they call the Townies.

    Listen 25:00
  • Tuesday April 03, 2012

    April 3, 2012 Part 2

    In part two of this episode. Suicide is often thought to be a problem of the young. But it's not. A new documentary looks at how one family is dealing with the growing crisis involving seniors who take their own lives. And a pioneering plastic surgeon in B.C. helps her patients put on a happy face with the help of botox and fillers.

    Listen 27:30
  • Tuesday April 10, 2012

    April 10, 2012 Part 1

    In part one of this episode. Nelson B.C.'s homegrown opera is called KHAOS and it tells a story both ancient and modern.It's based on the ancient Greek myth of Demeter and her daughter Persephone. What has so captured the imagination of opera fans, though, is that the myth has been re-written to reference an ultra contemporary issue of climate change

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday April 10, 2012

    April 10, 2012 Part 2

    In part two of this episode. Tooker Gomberg was an Edmonton bicycle crusader, environmentalist, would-be-mayor of Toronto, sunflower lover and activist extraordinaire.With Angela Bischoff, his partner of 17 years, Tooker went about trying to change the world until he flamed out and tumbled into a deep depression.Not long ago, family friends, family and fellow rabble rousers gathered to mark the 8th anniversary of his death.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday April 17, 2012

    April 17, 2012 Part 1

    In part one of this episode.John Ware looms large in the small field of Black history in Alberta. Ware was a big man, a cowboy who played an important role in the early days of the ranching industry in Alberta. He died in 1905. John Ware was born in into slavery in the southern United States. He arrived in Alberta after the U-S civil war and the emancipation of slaves. But it was in Alberta he found his true home.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday April 17, 2012

    April 17, 2012 Part 2

    In part two of this episode. A story about people who left Israel, partly to escape the constant threat of war.So where did they end up? New York? London? Los Angeles? Montreal? Nope.In all places...in Saint John New Brunswick, a city Where the once thriving Jewish community was in danger of extinction

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday April 24, 2012

    April 24, 2012 Part 2

    In part two of this episode. The Nisga'a are a small band who live 20 hours drive north of Vancouver. And twelve years ago, the Nisga'a became the first band in Canada to sign a modern treaty. That treaty gave them a measure of self-government, and control of their land. This summer they will be able to own their own homes and to sell those homes to anyone - Nisga'a or not. The Nisga'a were the first aboriginal people to get their land back . Now they are the first to sell it off. But that has many concerned for the future of the Nisga'a Nation.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday April 24, 2012

    April 24, 2012 Part 1

    In part one of this episode. You ever wonder where actor Sach Baron Cohen learned how to make you laugh so hard? Like lots of other actors, Baron-Cohen studied with a master french clown named Philippe Gaulier. This winter the legend has been teaching 'the art of the clown' in Toronto.They've come from across North America to learn from his notoriously cruel and unusual teaching methods.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday June 05, 2012

    Fair Trade Diamonds

    In part one of this episode. They are marketed around the world as a symbol of love and commitment.But in Sierra Leone diamonds have a much darker history.The gems helped finance rebel fighters that terrorized the country during its bloody civil war.Now ,a decade after the war ended the diamond mining continues in Sierra Leone. Very little of that money ends up in the hands of the people that pulled the diamonds from the ground. that's something a Canadian NGO is trying to change.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday June 05, 2012

    Grandfather Clock

    In part two of this episode. There are those who love the sound of a ticking clock, and there are those who can't abide it. Bill Richardso is one of the former. Over the years, at flea markets and at auctions, he has acquired mantel clocks and bedside clocks and library clocks that chime as well as tick. When they all kick into action at once, at midnight and at noon especially, his home sounds like the jungle at dawn.For years, Bill has wanted a longcase clock - a grandfather clock.Recently, he acquired one.

    Listen 27:29
  • Tuesday June 12, 2012

    Compassion for dying horses

    In part one of this episode. Alberta is crazy for horses. There are more than a million of them in the province.And if you've ever loved an animal, you know how hard it can be to lose one .An Alberta man recently started a one of a kind service meant to bring some dignity to a horse's death. Greg Alexander is behind a company called "Just Passing".

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday June 12, 2012

    Injured Musicians

    In part two of this episode. It was somewhere around the 2 hour mark that Christine Harrison began to hit the wall. Christine Harrison is not a marathon runner ,she's a violinist. Christine Harrison was only in her 20's when her arm failed her. She went through 4 years of medical misadventure before her music career was back on track. And it was all a deep dark secret. That's because musicians can't afford to admit that their playing is not up to scratch. There is no "injured list" for orchestras.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday June 19, 2012

    Sarajevo

    In part two of this episode. 20 years ago the city of Sarajevo was being pounded by mortar shells and gunfire. It's believed that close to 12 thousand people were killed during that siege, many were children. It is a brutal legacy that has left profound emotional scars on the people who survived it.

    Listen 27:29
  • Tuesday June 19, 2012

    Keeping native languages alive in the city

    In part one of this episode. It's no secret that many First Nation bands are struggling to keep the languages alive on the reserves across Canada. But what about in the city? Many aboriginal people choose to live off reserve in cities like Calgary. Desirae Desnomie (Deh-NO-mee) is trying to preserve her Cree language and culture in an urban setting.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday June 26, 2012

    Keeping Inuit Culture Alive

    In part one of this episode. Junior high school boys often get their information about sex and relationships from their friends and increasingly the internet. And some of it is, to say the least ,neither positive or accurate. But a new program in one Calgary junior high is finding out that sex ed can be upfront and healthy. Wise Guyz is run by the Calgary Sexual Health Centre.

    Listen 27:29
  • Tuesday June 26, 2012

    Teaching boys Respect

    In part one of this episode. Junior high school boys often get their information about sex and relationships from their friends and increasingly the internet. And some of it is, to say the least ,neither positive or accurate. But a new program in one Calgary junior high is finding out that sex ed can be upfront and healthy. Wise Guyz is run by the Calgary Sexual Health Centre.

    Listen 24:59
  • Tuesday July 03, 2012

    Cancer Songs

    In part one of the this episode. A writer deals with his impending death by producing a volume of poems called "Cancer Songs." And the Baymen and the building boom. Construction workers from Newfoundland's outports talk about rebuilding St. John's for their urban cousins, whom they call the Townies.

    Listen 25:00
  • Tuesday July 03, 2012

    Senior Suicide

    In part two of this episode. Suicide is often thought to be a problem of the young. But it's not. A new documentary looks at how one family is dealing with the growing crisis involving seniors who take their own lives. And a pioneering plastic surgeon in B.C. helps her patients put on a happy face with the help of botox and fillers.

    Listen 27:30
  • Tuesday July 10, 2012

    KHAOS Opera

    In part one of this episode. Nelson B.C.'s homegrown opera is called KHAOS and it tells a story both ancient and modern.It's based on the ancient Greek myth of Demeter and her daughter Persephone. What has so captured the imagination of opera fans, though, is that the myth has been re-written to reference an ultra contemporary issue of climate change.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday July 10, 2012

    Tooker Gomberg

    In part two of this episode. Tooker Gomberg was an Edmonton bicycle crusader, environmentalist, would-be-mayor of Toronto, sunflower lover and activist extraordinaire.With Angela Bischoff, his partner of 17 years, Tooker went about trying to change the world until he flamed out and tumbled into a deep depression.Not long ago, family friends, family and fellow rabble rousers gathered to mark the 8th anniversary of his death.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday July 17, 2012

    Cowboy John Ware

    In part one of this episode.John Ware looms large in the small field of Black history in Alberta. Ware was a big man, a cowboy who played an important role in the early days of the ranching industry in Alberta. He died in 1905.John Ware was born in into slavery in the southern United States. He arrived in Alberta after the U-S civil war and the emancipation of slaves. But it was in Alberta he found his true home.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday July 17, 2012

    New Brunswick Jewish Community

    In part two of this episode. A story about people who left Israel, partly to escape the constant threat of war.So where did they end up? New York? London? Los Angeles? Montreal? Nope.In all places Saint John New Brunswick, a city where the once thriving Jewish community was in danger of extinction

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday July 24, 2012

    King of the Clowns

    In part one of this episode. You ever wonder where actor Sach Baron Cohen learned how to make you laugh so hard? Like lots of other actors, Baron-Cohen studied with a master french clown named Philippe Gaulier. This winter the legend has been teaching 'the art of the clown' in Toronto.They've come from across North America to learn from his notoriously cruel and unusual teaching methods.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday July 24, 2012

    Nisga'a Real Estate

    In part two of this episode. The Nisga'a are a small band who live 20 hours drive north of Vancouver. And twelve years ago, the Nisga'a became the first band in Canada to sign a modern treaty. That treaty gave them a measure of self-government, and control of their land. This summer they will be able to own their own homes and to sell those homes to anyone - Nisga'a or not. The Nisga'a were the first aboriginal people to get their land back . Now they are the first to sell it off. But that has many concerned for the future of the Nisga'a Nation.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday July 31, 2012

    Workplace Bully (May 2012 Encore)

    Later on In the Field.We know there are bullies on the school ground, and we know who they're picking on. It's the small kids, the new kids, the ones who don't speak English so well. The ones who don't have support from their peers. In the workplace, we know there are bullies too, that's no surprise to anyone. But you might be surprised to hear how often it happens. And it might be a big surprise to hear who's getting bullied.

    Listen 27:29
  • Tuesday July 31, 2012

    Burn Recovery (May 2012 Encore)

    In part one of this episode. Newfoundlander Pat Stamp was working as a welder on a tanker ship when there was an explosion.He was injured. Badly injured. He had basically lost his face.This healthy, handsome man with a bright future had burns to 40% of his body.Help came from an unlikely source: A former CIA operative, in Virginia. We meet the doctor who is restoring his looks and brightening his outlook on the future:

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday August 07, 2012

    Human Egg Donations (May 2012 Encore)

    In part two of this episode. In Canada it is illegal to pay for human eggs. That law has been in effect for almost a decade. But it's widely known in the business that there is a black market in this country but no charges have ever been laid.The fertility business remains the wild west of medicine. It also is fraught with danger for the women who donate their eggs.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday August 07, 2012

    Photo Booths (May 2012 Encore)

    In part one of this episode.Chances are, the last time you took a photo, you didn't need film.Maybe you used the camera in your cell phone, or attached to your laptop.And bingo you see the results instantly. Patience used to be a key part of photography....you'd take your film to a shop and a week later your prints would be ready. But in fact instant photography existed before the digital age.Think of photobooths.That technology has been around for more than a century.And they still have a passionate following.

    Listen 24:59
  • Tuesday August 14, 2012

    Fighting Student Apathy (August 2012 Encore)

    In part two of this episode. In Moncton, a couple of teachers were at wits end. When they looked around their classroom they saw groggy teenagers spending their free time typing the most mundane details of their lives into a laptop, or a smart-phone. Updating their friends about how long it took to brush their hair this morning, or what they had for supper. Those two teachers decided they were going to fight back against student apathy.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday August 14, 2012

    Cree Culture (May 2012 Encore)

    In part one of this episode. The Cree School Board in Northern Quebec is determined to make sure that young Cree feel at home with their traditional roots and language.From the first day they step into a pre-kindergarten class right through Grade 2 students only speak Cree in class. And right throught to the end of high school every student has to take courses in Cree culture.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday August 21, 2012

    God I'm angry (May 2012 Encore)

    In part two of this episode. God may be subtle,Albert Einstein once said,but he isn't mean. It seems a lot of people would disagree.Recent research has found that many people hold God personally accountable for bad things that happen in their life. And they are not afraid to show it.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday August 21, 2012

    T'Suu T'Ina Language (May 2012 Encore)

    In part one of this episode.According to the United Nations, 88 Aboriginal languages in Canada are nearing extinction.And among them, Tsuu T'ina, a language spoken on a reserve near Calgary, is one of the most endangered. Only a handful of people know it and at sixy three ,Gerald McGuinnis,is the youngest speaker. But things are changing on that reserve. There is push on to keep T'suu T'ina alive.

    Listen 24:59
  • Tuesday August 28, 2012

    Montreal Women's Symphony (May 2012 Encore)

    In part two of this episode. The story of Ethel Stark and the Montreal Women's Symphony Orchestra . In 1940 ,the same year that Quebec women got the vote , the celebrated violinist and conductor pulled together a rag-tag group of women who loved to play music. Within months, she conducted their first concert on the top of Montreal's Mount Royal. Just 7 years later they were at Carnegie Hall.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday August 28, 2012

    Converting to Islam (May 2012 Encore)

    In part one of this episode.Winnipeg's Muslim community has come a long way since the city's first Mosque opened in 1976. Today, there are 4 mosques and Muslim centres across the city and 2 full time Islamic schools.Some of that growth is due to immigration.And some is due to a growing number of Canadians converting to Islam.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday September 04, 2012

    "Some Kind of Wonderful"

    In Part two, hear about the creator of one of the most covered songs in history. "Some Kind of Wonderful" was written by John Ellison, now living in Hamilton, Ontario, but originally from the coal mining district of West Virginia.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday September 04, 2012

    Elite University

    It's a new season for "In the Field" and a new university year for thousands of Canadian students. Today David Gutnick brings us the story of "Quest" an elite college in British Columbia that is a delight for students and teachers alike.

    Listen 24:59
  • Tuesday September 11, 2012

    Healing Power of Music

    David has the story of how a Calgary Alzheimer patient is being helped by taking up the accordion again. A dynamic program called "Blueprint for Life" is helping Inuit youth at risk through hip hop.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday September 11, 2012

    Hartley's Violin

    The enduring story of the brave musicians, led by Wallace Harley, who continued to play while the Titanic was sinking.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday September 18, 2012

    Doing Good

    David calls this his "do gooders" edition. We hear about people who are actively trying to make the world a better place. Convicts fixing bicycles for charity; church-going bikers; Prince George's "pavement princesses" and the story of a long life well lived.

    Listen 24:59
  • Tuesday September 18, 2012

    Active Living

    David introduces us to one of the world's best highland dancers, Katie Lee of Edmonton. The First Nations' revered Sundance is enjoying a revival, as is respect for the knowledge of Inuit caribou hunters in northern Quebec and Labrador.

    Listen 27:29
  • Tuesday September 25, 2012

    Medicare history

    From Regina, a documentary about the controversy swirling around free medical care. The early days of Canada's medicare program were not easy, and some thought it was a communist plot. But Tommy Douglas helped pave the way for a program that many believe helps make Canada a great place in which to live.

    Listen 24:59
  • Tuesday September 25, 2012

    Learning about Traditions

    Parents are taking their children to a shoe store in Edmonton to learn how to tie their shoelaces. Producer Caroline Hillier goes out in the boat with her father to learn how he used to fish cod, and Inuit women attend a workshop to learn how their grandmothers made sealskin boots.

    Listen 27:28
  • Tuesday October 02, 2012

    Truth and Reconciliation

    Today, stories about people facing adversity, including the heartbreaking account of Charlie Menjack, a First Nations child who was forced into an Indian Residential School, but died running away. This is the legacy Canada's Truth and Reconciliation commission is trying to help heal. There's also the story of Hayward Morgan who chose to die, but first reconciled his family to his decision to stop dialysis. And the truth about navigating construction sites in Toronto, in a wheelchair.

    Listen 24:58
  • Tuesday October 09, 2012

    The Meaning of Work - Part 1

    On this episode of the show, we look at the meaning of the work. In this part, a documentary on a program for unemployed Toronto youth that teaches them job skills. Also, a story on one of Quebec’s “adapted workplaces” which are designed for people with various physical and mental challenges. Another story on a program in Vancouver that gets the unemployed kitted out for construction work, one of pair of steel-toed boots at a time. And how some unhappy people in Calgary getting work done, millions of dollars worth, on their leaky condos.

    Listen 25:00
  • Tuesday October 16, 2012

    Didn't See That Coming - Part 2

    In Part Two of our show on shock and surprise, few incidents were more shocking in Canada in the early 1970s than the Kingston Prison riot. More than 500 inmates took charge of the prison, grabbed several guards as hostages and started to tear their building apart. The authorities reacted by calling in the army and by preparing themselves for the worst possible outcome. Cool heads on both sides gradually brought this crisis under control, but not without deaths and injuries. Survivors look back more than 40 years after one of the most searing events in the history of Canadian penitentiaries.

    Listen 27:30
  • Tuesday October 16, 2012

    Didn't See That Coming - Part 1

    In this episode of the show we hear stories that evoke shock and surprise. In Part One we hear the amazing news that Newfoundland is gradually sinking into the North Atlantic – and how Newfoundlanders are taking this in their stride. Then there’s Kelly Hofer who shocked his friends and family by giving up his traditional life on a Manitoba Hutterite colony to move to Calgary to pursue a dream to become a big city photographer. Residents of the island of Haida Gwaii just off B.C.’s coast are surprised and saddened to see enormous amounts of Japanese tsunami debris wash up on their shores. A girl in Ottawa is attracting attention by befriending Walter the crow and … a student at the University of Saskatchewan is promoting greater levels of on campus blasphemy as an exercise in free speech

    Listen 25:00
  • Tuesday October 23, 2012

    Canadian beauty is about good hair, the Yukon, and music - Part 1

    In this episode of In The Field we explore concepts about beauty, including an entire community in Toronto dedicated to hair care, a Kenyan-Canadian who've discovered la dolce vitae in the tiny community of Old Crow, Yukon, and one of Canada's most beautiful singers.

    Listen 25:00