Show Highlights

  • Tuesday February 07, 2017

    The Philosopher's Walk - Jean Talon Market

    The Philosopher's Walk with Frédéric Bouchard

    Frédéric Bouchard is philosopher of science and biology at the University of Montreal, and the perfect companion for a walk through the Jean Talon Market. The result is a fascinating discussion about mushrooms, unpasteurized goat cheese and honey bees, and how they can make you think about humankind's place in the universe in a whole different way.

    Posted: Feb 07, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 23, 2016 1:33 PM ET
    read comments video audio
    Listen 53:57
  • Thursday February 09, 2017

    Capitalism's End Times - Poverty

    Surviving Post-Capitalism: Coping, hoping, doping & shopping

    The signs are troubling: the ever-widening chasm between the ultra-rich and everyone else. Mass protests. Political upheaval and social division. It looks as though the rocky marriage between capitalism and democracy is doomed, at least according to Wolfgang Streeck. In conversation with Paul Kennedy about his book How Will Capitalism End?, he makes the unnerving case that capitalism is now at a point where it cannot survive itself.

    Posted: Feb 09, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 10, 2017 3:35 PM ET
    read comments video audio
    Listen 53:59
  • Wednesday February 01, 2017

    Guantanamo Bay Camp Delta

    After Guantanamo

    In 2002, a 15-year-old boy was caught by American forces in Afghanistan after a firefight, and imprisoned in Guantanamo for the next 13 years. The boy was Omar Khadr, and his then little-known lawyer was Dennis Edney from Edmonton. From the Stratford Festival, Dennis Edney talks with Paul Kennedy about a life-changing experience that contains a challenge for us all.

    Posted: Feb 01, 2017 11:01 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 01, 2017 11:46 AM ET
    read comments audio
    Listen 53:58
Purchase past Massey Lectures on iTunes

Past Episodes

  • Friday February 17, 2017

    Jean Vanier

    The Rabbit and the Giraffe: Jean Vanier, Part 1

    "Community is a sign that love is possible in a materialistic world." Jean Vanier, who founded the l'Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that "normal" people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Now in his 80's, Vanier has spent a lifetime watching and learning and writing. Jean Vanier in conversation with Philip Coulter. Part 2 airs Friday, February 24.

    Posted: Feb 17, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 17, 2017 8:30 AM ET
    read comments audio
    Listen 53:58
  • Thursday February 16, 2017

    Analog Resistance - Magnitizdat Group

    Analog Resistance

    In the Soviet Union during the 1960s, young iconoclasts waged a musical battle against the banality of state-sanctioned culture. Subversive poet/musicians known as "Bards" were recorded at secret house concerts, and reel-to-reel audio tapes shared through a clandestine network. Simon Nakonechny unspools the little-known phenomenon of Magnitizdat, and ponders its parallels to forms of cultural dissidence in Russia today.

    Posted: Feb 16, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 17, 2017 8:05 AM ET
    read comments video audio
    Listen 53:58
  • Wednesday February 15, 2017

    Marriage of True Minds # 2 - (The Kiss/Klimt painting)

    The Marriage of True Minds, Part 2

    Can marriage be a source of inspiration, creativity, mutual influence, and intellectual support? From the admittedly painful history of Abelard and Heloise, to the complex modern relationship between Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, a picture emerges of married men and women who inspire one another in both life and love.

    Posted: Feb 15, 2017 3:48 PM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 15, 2017 12:36 PM ET
    read comments audio
    Listen 53:59
  • Tuesday February 14, 2017

    The Marriage of True Minds #1 - Venus and Adonis

    The Marriage of True Minds, Part 1

    More than thirty years ago, Paul Kennedy prepared a series that celebrated famous intellectual marriages. These relationships were consummated at various times, from the early Middle Ages to the late-twentieth century. We revisit that classic series from a more contemporary perspective, and wonder what might be learned, and what could be lost from looking for lessons from relationships in the past.

    Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:25 PM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 14, 2017 3:21 PM ET
    read comments audio
    Listen 54:00
  • Monday February 13, 2017

    Yuval Harari

    When Man Becomes God

    In his new book "Homo Deus", Yuval Harari argues that humankind is on the verge of transforming itself: advances creating networked intelligences will surpass our own in speed, capability and impact. But where will this leave us? Will we be enslaved by algorithms we can scarcely understand? Or will we incorporate these advances and become like gods? He joins host Paul Kennedy in conversation.

    Posted: Feb 13, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 11, 2016 3:28 PM ET
    read comments video
    Listen 53:59
  • Friday February 10, 2017

    Caribou Convention

    What's On Our Quarter? The past and future of Canadian caribou

    No, it's not a moose, which is what most people think it is. The animal is actually a caribou -- one of the most important but misunderstood species in Canada. Paul Kennedy reports from the International Caribou Conference in Thunder Bay about the past and the future of Canadian caribou.

    Posted: Feb 10, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 25, 2016 12:09 PM ET
    read comments audio
    Listen 54:00