Friday November 27, 2015

Who Owns Ancient Art? Part 2

The Parthenon Marbles were removed from Greece by the British in the early 1800s. Greece has continually called for their repatriation, though there is no international authority that can enforce it.

The Parthenon Marbles were removed from Greece by the British in the early 1800s. Greece has continually called for their repatriation, though there is no international authority that can enforce it. (© Andrew Dunn/Wikipedia)

Listen to Full Episode 53:59

When the the Taliban and ISIS destroy ancient artifacts, the world responds with outrage. But where should that outrage lead: taking ancient art out of the country of origin? Or would that amount to what some have called neo-colonialism and cultural genocide? Just who owns ancient art? That's the central question that Paul Kennedy explores in this two-part series, produced by contributor Anik See. In this episode, possible solutions to these age-old problems. **This episode originally aired June 19, 2015.


Participants in the program:

James Cuno is President and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, and former director at the Harvard Art Museums, the Courtauld Institute and the Art Institute of Chicago. He believes the concept of partage may prove indispensable.

Nika Collison is a member of the Haida Nation, and curator at the Haida Gwaii Museum. She works with her community and other museums to repatriate Haida ancestral remains and cultural treasures, striking a balance between culture and education.
 

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